domingo, 4 de novembro de 2018

Canon AE-1 (1976-1984)

Canon AE-1 (1976-1984)
#390
Esta fotografia é do exemplar que possuo

Características

The Canon AE-1 is a 35mm film SLR camera with shutter-priority automatic exposure and manual override, produced by Canon in Japan and produced between 1976-1984.

By using a microprocessor, Canon was able to simplify the design, and by using a highly automated production process, they were able to keep costs low. The result was one of the first affordable TTL autoexposure cameras to hit the market. After its introduction in 1976, the Canon AE-1 quickly became a very popular camera worldwide. The AE-1 was replaced a few years later by the AE-1 Program.

Fonte: Camerapedia


Especificações

Lens: Canon FD 50mm f/1.4 SC
Mount: Canon FD breech-lock mount, accepts New FD (FDn) lenses also; filter thread: 52mm
This is the Standard lens, other normal lens is Canon FD 50mm f/1.4 SSC. There are many Canon lenses for the camera
Aperture: up to f/22, setting: ring and scale on the lens for manual setting
Focus range: 0.6-10m +inf
DOF pre-view: button on the right of the lens flange
Lens release: press the silver button on the lens and turn to anti-clockwise
Focusing: manual, via Canon standard split image rangefinder with microprism collar
Shutter: cloth focal plane electronic shutter travelled horizontally, speeds: 2-1/1000 +B; setting : dial on left of the top plate
Shutter release: on the top plate, w/ cable release socket, w/ lock lever, L means the shutter locked; when on A, pressing half way, the meter is readable in the finder
Cocking lever: 120° stroke (partial strokes enabled). Ready position at 30°.
Canon Winder A optional for power winding
Frame counter: counts up, auto-reset, on the top plate
Viewfinder: fixed eye-level SLR pentaprism, split-image rangefinder encircled by microprism rangefinder at center with a fresnel matte screen. Exposure meter needle, aperture scale, over-exposure warning zone, stopped-down aperture metering needle and battery check indicator, and under-exposure warning LED and Manual control (M) signal are visible
Exposure meter: center-weighted CdS meter with shutter-priority automatic exposure, full-aperture TTL metering
Film speed range: 25-3200 ASA; setting: lift the knurled ring on the winding button and then set. If the speeds dial turns when you setting the ASA, turn it to B or 1000.
Metering range: EV 1-18 at 100 ASA/ISO
Exposure setting: shutter priority auto; set to A, while pressing the AE lock button on the lens turn the aperture ring of the lens; needle pointing along a vertical f-stop scale on the right side of the viewfinder. Shutter release lock lever must be on A.
Manual: TTL stopped-down match needle manual metering
Back-light control switch: silver button, on the right of the lens flange
Exposure compensation range: +1.5 EV.
Exposure preview switch: black button, on the right of the lens flange
Re-wind lever: folding cranck, on right of the top plate
Re-wind release: small knob on the bottom plate
Flash PC socket: Flash sync 1/60, auto-switching
Hot-shoe: the dedicated flash units are Speedlites
Self-timer: release lock lever sets to S , then release the shutter, the red LED blinks when self timer working; before the shutter release, you can cancel it by pressing the battery check button
Back cover: hinged, remowable, w/ memory slot
Engraving on the bottom plate: Canon, Japan
Tripod socket: ¼"
Strap lugs
Body: metal; Weight: 798g (with standard lens)
Battery: 4LR44 6V battery or 4x LR44 1.5 V batteries
Attention: the camera is fully battery dependant
Battery chamber: on front of the camera
Battery check: black button beside the re-wind lever. If the battery is in very good condition, in the viewfinder, metering needle stays below the index near 5.6. If it stays on index, it is in low condition and over the index the battery must be replaced.
On/off switch: shutter release lock lever must be on L
The winder terminals and coupling sockets are in the bottom plate.
Serial no. on the top plate
Date code: inside the film spool compartment, eg. R 217 means the production year 1977 and month.

Fonte: Camerapedia


Modelo

A minha possui o n.º de série 1886762. lente possui o n.º de série 133918.

Foi fabricada em outubro de 1978 uma vez que possui o código interno S1035. Ver Canon date codes: bobatkins.com

É o segundo exemplar que possuo.


Sítios de referência

Camerapedia

Canon date codes: bobatkins.com


Manual

Manual em inglês


Baterias
6V battery


Filme


Fotografias tiradas com esta máquina


Vídeos



sábado, 3 de novembro de 2018

Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic (1915-1926)

Kodak Vest Pocket Autographic (1915-1926)
#389
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Vest Pocket Kodak cameras were a best-selling folding camera series made by Eastman Kodak (Rochester), from 1912 to 1935. They were the first cameras to use the smaller 127 film reels. "Hawk-Eye" versions of the Vest Pocket Kodaks were premium models, and the "Special" models had more sophisticated lens/shutter combinations. A special Vest Pocket wooden development tank for the typIe 127 rollfilm was available from Kodak, as well as a special Vest Pocket enlarging camera.

Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak (1915-1926)

The Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak was the version advertised in the U.S.A. as the "Soldier's camera" during World War I. It was very successful, selling 1,750,000 units. It was of the compact strut folding type and had the meniscus lens or a U.S.-speed 8 Rapid Rectilinear lens.

The camera back had an area through which notes could be written onto the paper backing of the 127 film, the "autographic" feature - invented by Henry J. Gaisman.

Source: camera-wiki.org

t was made by Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester N.Y., U.S.A., from 1912 to 1926.
They sold about 1.750.000 units.
The VPK was the first camera to use 127 film.
This name it's self explanatory, it was a camera that could be carried in a vest pocket. In fact it isn't much bigger than many of the compact digital of today.
This was the successor of the long praised collapsible large Kodak cameras.
It's success was due to the small size and price. They sold for $6.
This price was possible due to it's simpler construction, instead of  wood, metal, leather... of the older and bigger models the VPK was made of an aluminium alloy fastened with rivets. What explains why there are still so many, in very good condition, today.

The first models didn't had the autographic feature and were painted in smooth black.
The autographic model was launched in 1915 with a black crackled finish, also called Japan crystal.
There was some special models with better, some focusing, lenses, like the Rapid Rectilinear by Baush & Lomb, the Cooke triplet, Zeiss Tessar and the rare Lacour-Berthiot Olor. Also different shutters and, some of these special models, were covered in leather.

As it was a very portable camera, there was a lot of WWI soldiers who took them to the trenches, what was strictly prohibited. That gave it the nickname "Soldier's camera".

Charles Lindberg used to carry one with him in his adventurous flights.

George Mallory, maybe the first person to reach the Everest summit, had one with him when he and Andrew Irving headed to the last part of the ascent. Both died, the body of Mallory and most of the personal effects were found, Irving's body and the camera were never recovered, in it could be the proof of their feat.



Specifications

Single meniscus lens about 75mm 1:11
Three blades, Kodak ball bearing shutter, 1/25, 1/50 B and T
Fixed focus ~1.8m to infinity
8, 4x7cm, exposures on 127 film
Folding bellows in trellis struts
Autographic window and stylus
Size and weight: 67x121x30mm, 316g

Source: camarasclassicas.blogspot.com


Model

Serial number 1815124


Reference sites

camarasclassicas.blogspot.com

camera-wiki.org


Manual

English manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sábado, 20 de outubro de 2018

Neoka 35-K (~1959)

Neoka 35-K (~1959)
#388
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Neoca was a Japanese company that made the Mizuho Six 6×6 folders from 1951, and later Neoca cameras.
The company's full name at first was Mizuho Kōki Seisakusho (ミヅホ光機製作所), this name was translated as Mizuho Optical on some body engravings, and the logo was MKS in a stylized lens scheme. In July 1952 the company became Mizuho Kamera Kōgyō K.K. (ミヅホカメラ工業㈱), translated as Mizuho Camera Ind. Co, Ltd (observed on a box for a Mizuho Six, for sale in an online auction). While Mizuho seems to have consistently been written in advertisements as ミヅホ (never ミズホ), the company is, rightly or wrongly, sometimes referred to as 瑞穂 (which too would be read "Mizuho").
In November 1954 the company became Neoca, more fully Neoca Kabushiki Kaisha (ネオカ株式会社).
Neoca went bankrupt in January 1960.
Source: camera-wiki.org


The Neoca 35K was an inexpensive scale focusing Neoca model from about 1959 and lacks the rangefinder focus found on the Neoca 2S and Neoca 35 IV S. The shutter ranges from 1/25 to 1/300 sec., and so lacks the slow shutter speeds of the other models as well. The 35K does offer lever wind film advance, where the Neoca 35A used knob winding.

Source: camera-wiki.org



Specifications

Neoca 35K – c1959. Scale focus 35mm. Direct descendant of the Nihon Seiki ‘Micronta 35’ and ‘Ranger 35’ cameras, but with lever advance. Neokor f3.5/45mm in B, 25-300

Source: seqvintagecameras.com

Model


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

seqvintagecameras.com


Manual

English manual (Neoka 35)


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

quinta-feira, 20 de setembro de 2018

Halina Rolls (1963)

Halina Rolls (1963)
#387
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Halina Rolls is a 35mm viewfinder camera made by Haking in Hong Kong, possibly around 1960. The camera feels cheaply made; the lens barrel and most of the body is plastic, with a fake selenium meter window beside the viewfinder. Film advance is by lever; rewind is by a thumb-wheel extending all around the end of the camera. The shutter release has a long travel to operate the everset shutter. The film counter - above the winding lever - must be manually rotated to reset when loading a film.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

F/3.5

45mm lens

"Empire Made"


Model


Reference sites

camerapedia


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

sábado, 15 de setembro de 2018

Olympus OM10 (1979)

Olympus OM10 (1979)
#386
Esta fotografia é do exemplar que possuo.

Características

The Olympus OM system was released by Olympus in 1972. The Olympus OM bodies were divided in a high range and a middle range. The top range were the one digit models with a hyphen: OM-1/2/3/4. The two digit models were the middle range. All these bodies could take Olympus OM lenses (which means all potentially have DOF preview functionality, as this was standard on most OM Lenses).

Following the introduction of autofocus into the market, Olympus released two motor-driven bodies: the OM707 and the OM101. Later yet, a re-branded Cosina model was released, known as the OM2000.

Fonte: camerapedia


Especificações

The OM10 was the first consumer OM series body. Launched in 1979 it accepted the full line of OM lenses and most of the OM accessories for a lower price. The lower price was reflected in the construction of this camera and the features available, however, it was still a very competent performer and it reflected the elegant lines established by the compact OM-1 and 2 designs. Early production runs of the OM10 have known malfunction issues with electronics, metering, and shutter magnets. Olympus later changed the shutter to a 'Type II' design to correct the latter problem.

In its standard configuration the OM10 offered aperture priority automatic exposure, simple and accurate enough for a consumer camera in most lighting situations. It also offered exposure compensation for more complicated lighting situations and for more advanced users. Selection dial upon the top allowed for selection of Aperture Priority, B and Manual adapter, The small plug-in manual adaptor was available as an accessory to enable manual control of shutter speed, if no Manual Adapter was plugged in and the camera switch set to Manual Adapter then the camera shutter speed was set to fixed 1/60 for flash work.

While not well known to consumers, the focusing screen for the OM10 is indeed interchangeable, though not as easily as the OM-1. It shares the same focusing screen as the OM-1, but the extra protruding tab needs to be cut off as the OM10 doesn't have a placeholder for it.

The OM10 can accept all the lenses of the OM system.

The finder screen is fixed, as well as the back. It can accept the winder but not the motor drive. It existed in chrome and in black finish.

Fonte: camerapedia

Film Format : 24mm x 36mm
Type: :TTL auto-exposure 35mm SLR camera
Lens mount : OLYMPUS OM Mount. About 50 different Zuiko interchangeable lenses.
Shutter : Electronically controlled cloth focal plane shutter. Manual exposure: B, 1 - 1/1,000 sec. with adapter.
Synchronization : X type contact, hot shoe.
Automatic exposure control : Aperture preferred automatic exposure control electronic shutter type. TTL Direct Light Measuring System, center-weighted average light measurement. Measuring range: ASA 100 from F1.2, about 60 seconds to F16, 1/1,000 second.
Programmed Automatic Exposure : TTL direct, measuring range : approximate. -5 EV ~ 18 EV , 50mm F 1.4
Manual exposure : With a Manual Adapter
Self timer : 15sec. delay
Metering system : Olympus direct metering in body. Full aperture center weighted metering.
Measuring range : EV1.5 - EV17 (ASA 100 with F 1.2 standard lens).
Film speed Setting : ASA 12 - 3200
Power source : Two 1.5V silver oxide batteries Eveready S-76 or equivalents or alkaline manganese batteries LR 44
Viewfinder : Pentaprism type finder.
Finder view-field : 93% of actual picture field.
Reflex mirror : Quick return type (without lockup).
Manual film advance : Lever type with 130° angle for one long or several short strokes, pre-advance angle 30°
Exposure counter : Progressive type with automatic reset.
Film rewind : Rewind crank
Weight : 430g , body alone
Dimensions : 136 x 84 x 50mm, body

Fonte: thecamerasite.net


Modelo

A minha é do modelo prateado e tem o n.º de série 2169939 and came with a Quantaray Multi-coated 135mm lens.


Baterias

2 baterias LR44 1,5V

LR44 1,5V
Sítios de referência

camerapedia

thecamerasite.net


Manual

Manual em inglês


Vídeos





terça-feira, 4 de setembro de 2018

Zeiss Ikon Box Tengor type 55-2 (1938-1950)

Zeiss Ikon Box Tengor type 55-2 (1938-1950)
#385
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Box Tengor is a series of medium format film box cameras made by Zeiss Ikon and produced between 1926-1956.

It is a continuation model of Goerz Box Tengor that produced by Goerz before the merger to form the Zeiss Ikon.

There are many types of the camera during its long production period for 127VP, 120, 116/616, and 129 film sizes.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

Type 55-2 1938-1950

Same as the 54/2 1938 but serrated round winding knob with leatherette center, black front trim
Double exposure interlock on the winding knob


Model 54/2:

1934-38
Film: 120 roll film
Lens: Goerz Frontar Achromat two elements
Aperture: switchable: f/11, f/16 or f/22
Shutter: single speed 1/25 +B
Focusing: switchable: 1m, 3m+, 8m+
Viewfinder: two built-in brilliant finders, one for vertical, one for horizontal image format

Source: camerapedia


Model

Model 55/2


Reference sites

camerapedia

camarassinfronteras


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


segunda-feira, 27 de agosto de 2018

Praktica BCA Electronic (1986-1989)

Praktica BCA Electronic (1986-1989)
#384
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Praktica BCA Electronic is a 35mm SLR made in Dresden by Pentacon. It has aperture priority auto-exposure. The more ergonomic variant Carl Zeiss Jena Jenaflex AC-1 was made for the British market since 1986.

Source: camera-wiki.org


Specifications

Type: SLR camera body
Manufacturer: Pentacon, Dresden (DDR, former East Germany)
Years of production: 1983-1990
Film: 35mm with speeds 12 to 3200 ISO
Lens mount: Praktica bayonet with EDC (electronic diaphragm control)

Source: camera-wiki.org

Producer data
Producer: VEB Pentacon Dresden Betrieb des Kombinates VEB Carl Zeiss Jena
Responsible constructor: Werner Hahn, Rolf Noack
Production period: August 1986 to December 1989
No of produced cameras: 231,806

Technical properties of the camera
Shutter type: steplessly working electronically controlled vertical-run metal-blade focal plane shutter
Exposure time (possible settings): B, steplessly automatic speeds between 1 sec and 1/1000 sec; mechanical range 1/60 sec
View finder: fixed eye-level view finder (Pentaprism, field of view: 95%) with field lens with triple rangefinder wedge, truncated microprism screen, groundglass field, LEDs- for shutter speed signaling changes their brightness with brightness of the image
Red LED for over-exposition
Green LED for 1/1000 to 1/60
Yellow LED for 1/30 to 1 sec
Red LED for under-exposition
Green LED - flash ready signal
Mirror: instant-return mirror
Film transport / frame counter: single stroke 125° wind-on quick-release lever with 25° stand off position, accepts B-motor winder, folding crank rewind knob, auto-zeroing frame counter
Lens mount: Praktica-B-mount with EDC (electronic diaphragm control)
Self timer: mechanically, approx. 8 sec delay
Battery: VARTA V28 PX (4xLR44)
Metering system: TTL-metering (12 to 3200 ASA) using electronic diaphragm control (EDC) for measurement with open aperture using a Cadmium sulphide  photo-resistor, auto exposure compensation with +/- two shutter speeds in half steps, automatic exposure system with memory key, battery check facilities
Flash system: X-synchronisation (1/60), accessory shoe at the top of the pentaprism
Flash indication: yes
Aperture reflection into view finder: yes
General comments: version with Roman numerals for auto exposure correction

Source: praktica-collector.de


Model

Serial number: 9161418


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org


Manual

English manual


Batteries

V28 PX 6V battery

Film



Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sexta-feira, 24 de agosto de 2018

Pentor Super TL (1968-1976)

Pentor Super TL (1968-1976)
#383
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Praktica super TL is a 35mm SLR manufactured by Pentacon in Dresden (DDR, former East Germany). It features an M42 lens mount and stop-down TTL metering and a focal plane shutter. Year: 1968-76

That camera was also available with a black topcover. A special version of the Praktica Super TL was sold in The Netherlands as the Pentor Super TL. It was also sold by Hanimex as the Hanimex Praktica super TL, Hanimex Super TL and Hanimex Pro TL. Porst in Germany sold it as the Porst Reflex FX6 while Foto-Quelle sold it as the Revueflex SL. In the United States it was sold as the Cavalier STL-I.

Source: camera-wiki.org

Single Lens Reflex camera for 24 x 36 mm on 35 mm film with interchangeable lens. Provided with 2 contacts for flash cord (F and X). Fabric focal plain shutter with 10 shutter speeds from 1 sec. - 1/500 + B. Release button is blocked against double exposures. Manual setting of shutterspeed and aperture with help of a needle in the viewfinder based on TTL metering. Adjustable film sensitivity for the exposure meter; diaphragm jumps to the selected value when a special button next to the lens is pressed to activate the exposure meter in order to measure the light correctly. Release button can be locked. Focusing variable via a distance control ring around the lens from 0,33 meter to infinity; focus can be controlled on the image in the viewfinder.There is also a depth of field scale around the lens. Variable iris diaphragm, aperture settings from 1,8 to 16. Interchangeable lens Pentacon auto 1 : 1,8 / 50 mm with screw mount (Praktica thread). Filmtansport via advance lever with frame counter and automatic stop. See-through viewfinder on projected image of the exposure lens. Mirror flips up at shutter release and returns automatically. Power supply from 1 mignon cell. Memodisk for type of film (color, transparancy, black and white) and number of exposures (36, 20, 12).

Source: heinbanken.nl


Specifications

Producer data
Producer: Kombinat VEB Pentacon Dresden
Responsible constructor: Herbert Welzel
Production period: May 1968 to January 1976
No of produced cameras as a part of Praktica super TL series: 508,656

Technical properties of the camera
Shutter type: mechanically controlled horizontal-run rubberized cloth-blind type
Shutter exposure time (possible settings): B, 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250,1/500
View finder: fixed eye-level view finder (Pentaprism) with Fresnel lens and microprism range finder as focusing screen, built-in shutter speed meter
Mirror: instant-return mirror
Film transport / frame counter: quick-release lever, Pentacon Loading-System, fold-out rewind crank Lens mount: M42x1
Self timer: none
Battery: VARTA V 625
Metering system: TTL-exposure meter using CdS-photoresistor (cadmium sulphide)  used with a innovative beam-splitter in the pentaprism using stopped-down metering
Flash system: X- and F-synchronisation with two flash coaxial sockets at the bottom of the front  of the camera body
Flash indication: none
Aperture reflection into view finder: none

General comments
Pentor version of the Praktica super TL for the Netherlands with silver top cover
Pentor means PENTACON and ORWO the names of the famous East German Camera and Film companies

Source: praktica-collector.de


Model

Serial number 300844.

Lens: Tessar 2.8/50 sn. 9247937.


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

heinbanken.nl

praktica-collector.de


Manual

English manual


Batteries
1 PX625 Battery


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sábado, 4 de agosto de 2018

Canon EOS 1000FN (1992)

Canon EOS 1000FN (1992)
#382
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Two years after debut of the highly successful original EOS 1000F/Rebel. Canon introduced the EOS-1000QD/Rebel II in April, 1992. The Company adopted the same philosophy of the predecessor with two separate models in either a choice of basic body or one with a built-in flash version. Similarly, two separate designations were used for US (Rebel II (QD) & Rebel S II (QD) and other markets (EOS-1000N & EOS-1000FN). Apparently, some great features found in earlier EOS-10s & EOS-100/Elan QD was deployed in this second generation Rebel where a silent film advance and rewind mechanism was used in its design (the noise reduction for film advance has significantly improved by approx. 40% and 35% in rewinding but infrared system used in EOS-10S was not used). Wel, the silent waves camera operation in some of these EOS bodies also work efficiently with the emergence of the second generation of micro-USM lenses. That is not all it has to offer, an improved AF performance and microcomputer of the camera has improved AF speed 50% faster than any of the earlier EOS-1000/Rebel QD models. Well, generally, I used to separate the original and second series via its new vertical-travel, focal-plane electronic shutter, which has an extended shutter speed range from 30 sec. to 1/2000 now (the original rebel has 1/000 top speed, but the sync speed of both series are still limiting to rather disappointing 1/90 sec). Another improvement is the incorporation of a popular redeye prevention system with the 1000FN/Rebel SII QD models.
Other notable improvements over previous models are a slightly more powerful (GNO 14 as compared with 12) flash output for the built in flash for applicable models and a built-in soft focus mode. Errr ... there is also a choice of music selections (with beeper and selectable musical melodies by Vivaldi, Beethoven and Bach) when self-timer is activated during count down. In the case of the soft focus mode (similar to Minolta's soft focus program card), it is not running optically (you can use an EF lens with similar effect) but on both the EOS-1000FN/Rebel SII QD, It works by taking two images on the same film frame in rapid succession, shooting one sharp and then defocusing the lens for the second one (the ratio can be adjusted in 1:1 and 1:2). However, one discomforting part in the design of the camera is still centered around the black EF reinforced plastic lense bayonet mount. Although the camera is primarily designed for mass amateur users, where presumably owners may not always be frequently changing lenses, but the cleverly stealth black lense bayonet mount is one area that might raise some doubt over durability issue. The metering and exposure control modes provide is extensive enough for anyone to make good use of them for tackling any photographic situations. The camera has a flexible exposure control in shutter priority AE, aperture priority AE, intelligent program AE, four PIC image Modes, depth-of-field priority AE TTL, A-TTL flash program AE and metered manual via the use of a composite 6-zone SPC photosensor, provides fail-safe evaluative metering, and center partial metering for tricky lighting metering.
Other secondary control includes ±2-step exposure compensation (in 1/2-step increments) and a more conveniently to use AE-Lock. One advantage of the upgrade to this popular EOS body is, since most of the controls are designed and located almost the same manner with many other Canon, user may easily get accustomed to this camera. Although it is not exactly a high-end spec EOS SLR, but it serves its purpose well to provide a good, reasonably well finished camera body to tab into the huge EOS photographic system.

Remarks:

* Probably the first of the EOS bodies that produced outside Japan (Canon's plant in Taiwan).
* These cameras are quiet versions of the earlier EOS-1000, and features new functions such as soft-focus mode and musical self-timer.
* Model-specific Specifications
* Built-in flash: Manual retractable, redeye reduction mode, with automatic firing mode (when necessary), GNO 14 (ISO100, m) (1000S QD, 1000FN/1000FN QD, 1000 QD-P) However, note that only forced firing is possible on REBEL SII/ REBEL SII QD. The EOS-1000N and REBEL II/REBEL II QD do not have a built-in flash.
* AF Illuminator: Models with built-in flash support the AF Illuminator.
* QD models are provided with five imprint date items (including imprint OFF).
* Panorama shooting on the QD-P is by panorama adapter PA-1000. A panorama frame is also attached to the focusing screen. External identifications are indicated by the red outlines. Other features remain literally unchanged.

Source: mir.com.my


Specifications

Camera Type: 35mm focal-plane shutter multi-mode AF SLR camera with buitl in film advance
Picture Size: 24mm x 36mm
Normal standard zoom lense: EF 35-80mm f/4-5.6, or others
Lens Mount: CANON EF mount
AF System: TTL-SIR phase detection. AF modes: One-Shot AF/Predictive AI Servo AF (automatic switchover) and Manual Focus
AF operating range: at ISO 100: EV1- EV18.
Shutter: Vertical-travel, focal-plane electronic shutter. 30 sec. - 1/2000 sec., Bulb, X-sync at 1/90 sec. (hot shoe) in 1/2 stop increments

Viewfinder: Fixed eye-level pentaprism.
Viewfinder magnifications: 0.75x magnification
Filed of view: 90% H, 90% V
Viewfinder Information: AF mark, AF in-focus indicator, partial metering circle, depth-of-field AE, shutter speed, aperture setting, flash on/ready, soft-focus value, AE lock, camera shake alert, exposure compensation, out of coupling range warning, manual exposure level, flash charged completion, and red-eye reduction lamp.
Focusing Screen: Fixed type with AF frame with partial metering area mark. Full-screen New laser matte screen
Metering: Composite SPC for TTL full-aperture metering (using 6-zone SPC photosensor, evaluative metering, and center partial metering can be selected.
Exposure Control: Shutter priority AE, aperture priority AE, intelligent program AE, four PIC image Modes, depth-of-field priority AE TTL and A-TTL flash program AE, metered manual
Exposure compensation range: ±2 EV (in 1/2-stop increments). AE lock enabled.
Metering range: EV +2 to + EV20 (50mm f1l.4 lens @ ISO 100)
Film speed range: ISO 25 to 5000 automatically set in 1/3 step increments according to DX code, manual setting possible
External LCD display: Shutter speed, aperture setting, soft-focus value, film speed, film status indicator, manual exposure level, sound set No. and setting indicator, depth-of-field AE, battery check, and other indications.
Built-in Flash: Located on pentaprism hump. Manually retractable head with TTL autoflash control (fires automatically in backlight and low-light conditions) with off-the-film (OTF) metering. Guide No. 14 (at ISO 100 in m).

Red-eye reduction: Provided
Power Source: One 6 V 2CR5 lithium battery
Battery Chekcer: 4-stage display on LCD at all times
Film Transport: Prewind film loading, auto-winding by built-in miniature motor, winding speed 1 frame/sec. during continuous shooting, automatic rewind at completion of designated number (36) of exposures, automatic stop at completion of rewind

Film Loading & Advance method: Align film leader at mark, then close the camera back for prewind loading. First, the entire roll is wound on the take-up spool. Then each time a picture is taken, the film advances back into the cartridge.
Film advance speed: 1 fps.
Film Rewind: After the last frame is exposed, the film is rewound automatically.
Self timer: Built-in electronic self-timer (with beeper and selectable musical melodies by Vivaldi, Beethoven and Bach).
Dimensions: 148mm x 99.8mm x 69 mm
Weight: approx. 470g (body); 510g (with battery)
Misc. Specs.: ±2-step exposure compensation (in 1/2-step increments), multiple exposure, soft-focus mode
Dedicated accessories: None

Source: mir.com.my


Model

Serial number 4015573


Reference sites

mir.com.my


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2CR5 battery
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



quinta-feira, 2 de agosto de 2018

Kodak Star 275 (1993-1995)

Kodak Star 275 (1993-1995)
#381
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Kodak Star 275 camera was manufactured in China from 1993 until 1995 when production stopped 23 years ago. The Star 275 was designed to take 35mm, Cartridge Roll film. The camera requires 2, AA batteries. Unloaded, the camera weighs 155.00 g (5.47 oz.), with batteries 205.00 g (7.23 oz.), and with film, 224.00 g (7.9 oz.). Initially priced at $41.95, the Star 275 would cost $65.65 in 2011. Features include integrated flash.

Source: camerahistoryproject.com


Specifications

Years Made 1993-1995
MSRP $41.95 ($65.65 2012 Dollars)
Film 35mm Film
Weight 155.00 g (5.47 oz.)
Date Acquired February 2nd, 2013
Battery 2 x AA
Country of Manufacture China
Shutter Speeds: Fixed Shutter Speed
Shutter Type: Leaf
Aperture Settings: Fixed Aperture
Lens Mount: Fixed
Viewfinder: Plain
Focal Range: Fixed

Source: camerahistoryproject.com


Model


Reference sites

camerahistoryproject.com


Manual


Batteries

2 AAA batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

terça-feira, 31 de julho de 2018

Sinpo AF Mini

Sinpo AF Mini
#380
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Plastic motorized  point and shoot camera, made in Taiwan.


Specifications

F/4.5

28mm lens

35mm film

Flash

Motorized

point and shoot

2 AA batteries


Model


Reference sites


Manual


Batteries

2 AAA batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

domingo, 29 de julho de 2018

Vivitar Tec 45 (~1985)

Vivitar Tec 45 (~1985)
#379
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

I am probably one of the few people in the world who is happy to come across a cheap Vivitar point & shoot.  Many times I have sorted through a pile of plastic cameras pulling out all the Vivitars.  Maybe someday I will figure out why I am drawn to these cameras.  However when I do I would guess that I will still be short of having an example of each camera, since the number of Vivitar camera names seem to be near infinity. The Vivitar TEC 45 is one of the more ambitious cameras from this group.  It actually has some kind of auto focus mechanism and more than one aperture/shutter speed combination.  When you push the shutter button half-way a green circle appears when the focus and exposure is set.  There is a flash that pops up if there isn't enough light.  All this is powered by one AA battery. Judging by the styling and the presence of DX encoding I guess this camera was sold in the early 1990's.  I would like to say that I have found a hidden jewel in this camera, however I don't think that I did. Still the Vivitar TEC 45 is a competent camera.  Probably very good for taking the family snapshots back in the day.

The Vivitar TEC 45 seems to be a very obscure camera.  A search on Google returned no useful information.  And a search on Flickr only gave one picture.  That is probably the least amount of info that I have been able to find for a camera that I have written about.

Source: beacon225.blogspot.com

Announce in Popular Photography

Specifications

Source:


Model

Serial number L1110965


Reference sites

beacon225.blogspot.com

Popular Photography


Manual


Batteries

1 AA battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sexta-feira, 27 de julho de 2018

Fujifilm Fotonex 250ix ZOOM (1997)

Fujifilm Fotonex 250ix ZOOM (1997)
#378
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

he Fuji Fotonex 250 Zoom was not much smaller than the average 35mm compact AF zoom. It wasn't much different in any way, despite having a clean and easily-handled design which slipped neatly into a pocket.
So it sat in the office for a few days, and no-one really paid much attention to it. Then I loaded it up and actually took it around with me for a week. Suddenly, the little switch which changes the viewfinder masking from Classic (35mm shape) to HDTV (16:9 ratio) or Panoramic (3:1 long thin print) came to life. In conjunction with the 25-55mm zoom lens, more or less equal to a 28-65mm on 35mm, the ability to preselect the format and compose shots to suit turned out to be an enjoyable creative function.

I found myself handing the camera to Shirley, then saying 'hey, try a vertical panoramic on that shot!' only to find that she was already doing exactly that.  Everyone enjoyed using the camera, loaded with Kodak's Advantix 200 film which overcame problems of dull light and indoor flash, and objections to its viewfinder were overcome as we learned to centre the eye precisely and avoid it blacking out.

Finally, after a few shots taken in the botanical gardens at Dawyck in Scotland, a few at home, and some family snaps at son Richard's house, the 40-exposure roll was finished. Forty exposures may not seem much more than a standard 135/36, but as I normally load 24s for this kind of colour neg snap, it seemed like an endless roll.

Then the downside emerged - our local Boots, which normally takes any non-rollfilm colour neg film and processes it overnight for under fiver with excellent 6 x 4 gloss prints, had no idea what the APS roll was or any instructions on how to process it. They couldn't accept it.

Our local small High Street photo dealer in Kelso, Hector Innes, was completely aware of what to do. Photon readers may recall that it was Hector who put a Casio QV-10 digital camera in stock before any other shop had them, and for the record, he also bought one of the first Photo-CD players and has 'slide showed' his portfolio of wedding pictures ever since, constantly playing next to the counter.

Hector also bought APS film and cameras from Kodak the day they became available, and before I had had a chance to see them, his first cameras had sold out. He was complaining that Minolta's more expensive and fully specified cameras, which he could have sold just as easily and quickly, were not due to arrive for a couple of months.

He took the film from me, and gave me the bad news - it would take a full week to go back to Kodak for processing, no local lab had the facilities, and it would cost an unspecified figure which could be well into the teens if I had used the panoramic mode often. The 10" long pan prints cost more than the standard ones.

So I handed it over and resigned myself to a long wait and expensive bill for a bundle of snaps.

When the day came, any misgivings disappeared. Instead of some floppy envelope with a docket stuck to it and negs floating around in bits of loose sleeving, Alastair Innes produced a hard plastic and card case resembling a VHS cassette box extended 50% in length. Not only did this look like the £11.49 (inc VAT) I was going to pay, but it felt good. Inside this snap-shut case with its colourful Kodak livery and designer paper engineering, a neat recess held the film, all negatives safely archived away from fingerprints. In the lid, an index print like a full colour contact sheet showed our shots with the masking we had selected.
The prints themselves were arranged in order of format - on top, the Classic 6 x 4 prints in order of taking; below this, the HDTV 'long' prints, and at the bottom fitting precisely into the compartment the panoramic prints.

The general standard of printing, considering that no special measures had been taken, was excellent. The Advantix 200 film gave high sharpness, and grain comparable to a good 400 speed on 35mm. Kodak might deny this, but some panoramic prints from a Konica disposable panoramic loaded with 400 speed film were pretty much exactly the same.

The only failures, in terms of print density, were images which should have been richer and darker because no sky was included. These were exposed or printed too light. Poor flash exposure contributed to some familiar gritty underdone low-light snaps, which I had hoped that APS might eliminate.

The overall impression was that this box of prints was well worth the money, and that the compact Fuji Fotonex camera was 'bigger' than 35mm. The Fotonex viewfinder was misleading, and showed a heavily cropped frame which appeared to match the equally heavy crop shown on the index print - yet the actual prints had far more visible on them, especially on wide-angle P shots.

While I do not see the Advanced Photo System having much relevance to our readers with professional or creative interests, it can not fail to catch on with discerning casual photographers. With this quality of presentation delivered by Kodak, professionals will have to upgrade the way they deliver both social and commercial work. A glassine envelope just isn't enough.

Conclusion

With superb results, negligible weight and complete ease of the use the little Fuji camera does exactly what APS compacts were supposed to do. The film delivers the goods and the processing is excellent. You can not fail to be, as I repeat, impressed.
The Advanced Photo System is set to be a winner and every film exposed by 'early adopters' will help sell the system to Christmas season buyers. Follow my example and try it, and you'll just light up with a big grin when you get your first results back.

But where will you store that bookcase-full of big presentation cases? And will you have the heart to break up the box and put prints in albums? Products are already on the way to file and present APS work more space-efficiently - watch our news pages monthly for updates.

Source: iconpublications.com


Specifications

Source:


Model

Serial number 40104394


Reference sites

iconpublications.com


Manual


Batteries

CR123A battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

quarta-feira, 25 de julho de 2018

Kodak Ektra 200 (1980-1987)

Kodak Ektra 200 (1980-1987)
#377
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 


The Kodak Ektra 200 is among many 110 film cameras made by Kodak. It used disposable flip-flash for indoor photography, was made in (West) Germany, and was produced from 1980 to 1987.

110 film is still available, but flip-flash is not.

Source: camera-wiki.org


Specifications

Name    : Kodak Ektra 200
Produced between     : 1980 - 1987
Lens     : 22mm, f/11 Kodar
Shutter     : 3 speed
Film type     : 110 Cartridge
Picture size     : 13 x 17 mm

Source: kodak.3106.net

Model


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


segunda-feira, 23 de julho de 2018

Kalimar Spirit F

Kalimar Spirit F
#376
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Plastic point and shoot camera


Specifications

Made in China

35mm film

1 AA battery

Manual Wind and rewind

Flash

"Focus free"


Model


Reference sites


Manual


Batteries

1 AA battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sábado, 21 de julho de 2018

Sakar 880S

Sakar 880S
#375
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Plastic point and shoot camera with autoflash.


Specifications

Manual wind

Flash

2 AA batteries

Made in China


Model


Reference sites


Manual


Batteries

2 AA batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


quinta-feira, 19 de julho de 2018

Canon Prima Junior S Macro (1992)

Canon Prima Junior S Macro (1992)
#374
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Prima Junior S Macro (or Snappy EL Macro or CB35M in various countries) is a compact plastic point-and-shoot camera made by Canon.

Source: camera-wiki.org


Specifications

It is equipped with a fixed-focus 35mm f/3.8 lens (3 elements/3 groups) and has a single shutter speed of 1/125 sec. Film advance and rewind is motorized.

As extra feature this model has a close-focus ability of 50cm, hence the "Macro" name.

A CdS cell controls a 3-step program which corrects the aperture for the fixed shutter speed according to film speed and mode (flash-off, flash-on, and macro). At ISO 100/200: f/8 at 1/125 sec. with flash off, f/3.8 at 1/125 sec. with flash on, and f/16 at 1/125 sec. in macro mode. At ISO 1400: f/16 at 1/125 sec., f/8 at 1/125 sec. with flash on, and f/16 at 1/125 sec. in macro mode. The flash will fire in macro mode.

A red LED light is fitted for low-light warning.

The camera uses 2 AA batteries for power. Size: 124 x 69 x 51 mm, weight: 265 g (with batteries).

Source: camera-wiki.org


Model


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org


Manual


Batteries

2 AA batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


segunda-feira, 16 de julho de 2018

Camex 35 FMD

Camex 35 FMD
#373
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Plastic point and shoot camera with flash.


Specifications

35mm film

f/3.5

35mm lens

"Made in Japan"

Flash

2 AA batteries

Motor drive

ISO 100, 200, 400, 1000


Model

Number inside: 7371


Reference sites


Manual


Batteries

2 AA batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

sábado, 14 de julho de 2018

Canon Canodate E (1970)

Canon Canodate E (1970)
#372
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

A 1970 compact rangefinder camera from Canon, similar to the Canonet series but with an early date-imprinting function.

It uses a 40mm f/2.8 (5 elements in 4 groups) lens. The shutter is the electronically controlled Seiko ESF. The exposure meter uses a CdS cell for electronic exposure. Metering range of 1 to 17 EV (at ISO 100). Film speed can range from ISO 25 to 400. The finder has 0.6x magnification with 84% coverage which also contains parallax correction marks. It is powered by 2x 1.3V mercury cells batteries.

A newer minor revision of the Canodate E was released three years later in 1973. Canon refers to this as the Canodate E-N, but was just sold as the same Canodate E. This is mostly just a cosmetic change with the name plate's E in red. The date dials text with the Year in Blue, Month in Orange and Day in Red. The focusing ring is black coloured. The shutter also no longer functions when the battery is flat.

Source: camera-wiki.org

A databack to imprint the date on the picture is a standard feature today. The Canodate E pioneered this feature and realized the dreams of users.

With ISO 100 film, the camera’s Seiko ESF electronically-controlled program shutter could handle a wide exposure range from EV 1 (4 sec. at f/2.8) to EV 17 (1/500 sec. at f/16). With the dedicated Canolite D, the flash could fire automatically at EV 8 or lower.

For focusing, the camera had a double-image superimposing rangefinder. The viewfinder frame lines indicated the position of the imprinted date. The viewfinder also had a combination battery check and camera shake warning indicator, and flash indicator.

Source: global.canon


Specifications

Type: 35mm Lens-Shutter rangefinder camera with program EE and date imprinting (year, month, day).
Picture Size: 24 x 36 mm
Lens: 40mm f/2.8 (5 elements in 4 groups)
Shutter: Seiko ESF (electronically controlled), EV 1 (f/2.8 at 4 sec.) – 17 (f/16 at 1/500 sec.), X-sync, hot shoe and German socket for automatic flash. No self-timer.
Viewfinder: Coincidence rangefinder integrated with reversed Galilean viewfinder. Parallax correction with projected frames and correction marks. Date imprinting indicated on projected frame. Same lamp used for battery check, camera shake warning, and flash-required indicator. 0.6x magnification, 84% coverage.
EE: CdS cell for full-auto program EE. Metering range of EV 1 – 17 (at ISO 100). Film speed range of ISO 25 – 400.
Power Source: Two 1.3 V HM-N mercury cells
Film Loading & Advance: Slotted take-up spool. Advances with camera-top lever’s 130° single stroke (possible to wind with several short strokes).
Frame Counter: Counts up. Resets automatically when camera back is opened.
Film Rewind: Camera-top crank
Dimensions & Weight: 133 x 76 x 59 mm, 580 g

Source: global.canon


Model

Serial number 181180


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

global.canon


Manual

English manual


Batteries

Two M30 our #640 1.3v batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

quinta-feira, 12 de julho de 2018

Hanimex 35 HF Carmine Edition (1990-1992)

Hanimex 35 HF Carmine Edition (1990-1992)

#371
Esta fotografia é do exemplar que possuo

Características

A very basic compact camera for 35mm film. Made in China for Hanimex. Fixed focal length (described as "focus free"), built-in flash, manual wind on, manual loading and rewinding.

Source: camerapedia


Especificações

Manufactured: 1990-1992
Fixed focus 35mm lens with small aperture.
Fixed Shutter Speed.
Integrated flash.
Two AA batteries required for flash.
Film advance: Manual wind.
Built in lens cover.

Source: camerapedia


Modelo

A minha tem o n.º 2100 no interior.


Sítios de referência

camerapedia

cnet.com


Manual


Baterias

2 AA batteries

Filme


Fotografias tiradas com esta máquina


Vídeos