sábado, 19 de janeiro de 2019

Olympus IS-300 (1999)

Olympus IS-300 (1999)
#400
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Summary

Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. is pleased to introduce the IS-300 SLR. The high-performance model features autofocus and an Intelligent Variable-Power Flash System with GN25 power. It also has a built-in 28-110 mm 4x zoom lens with the precision of a large-diameter aspherical glass lens. For added convenience, the integrated lens cap opens automatically when the power is turned on.

RESPONSIVE HANDLING AND HIGHER PERFORMANCE

The design of the IS Series reflects a relentless pursuit of optimal handling and holding balance. The concept led to an L-shape with a built-in zoom lens combining superior resolution with high magnification. Covering every point from wide-angle to telephoto settings, the innovative SLRs are designed to help photographers capture the image in the mind's eye and achieve professional-looking results. One model after another has filled out the IS line-up since its launch in 1990.
The IS-300 is the latest addition to the series. Even though it has a versatile 28-110 mm 4x zoom lens, it is compact and very lightweight at 650 g. With its large-diameter aspherical glass lens, it also offers the quality of high-resolution images. The wide-angle 28 mm setting is ideal for indoor shots and expansive landscapes, while telephoto settings up to 110 mm make it easy to take natural-looking snapshots and striking portraits.
The Intelligent Variable-Power Flash expands the shooting range with GN25 power. Flash photography is also enhanced by such features as Super FP Flash in the Portrait Mode for synchronizing with shutter speeds up to 1/2000 sec. To minimize an unnatural cast and ensure lifelike results, the Auto color-Balancing Flash detects artificial light and fires automatically.

SOPHISTICATED BUT FRIENDLY

The IS-300's simple push-button operation lets photographers make the most of its SLR capabilities. Choosing the appropriate exposure is as easy as pressing the Direct Mode Select Button.
Bringing extra control to action photography, it is used in the Stop Action Mode to keep a moving subject in sharp focus - a feature especially helpful in recording sports events.
The design also reflects the importance placed on creative freedom and personal expression. The IS-300 has ±2 EV (1/2-step) Exposure Compensation, an Aperture-Preferred AE System and a Long Time Mode - features that give complete control over the exposure, depth of field and shutter speed.
The IS-300 offers both advanced functions and easy operation. Sophisticated but friendly, it combines the convenience of a compact camera with the high performance of an SLR.

COMPACT, LIGHTWEIGHT SLR WITH A BUILT-IN ZOOM LENS

The IS-300's high-resolution 4x zoom lens is incorporated in an L-shaped body. The layout reflects a relentless pursuit of optimal handling and holding balance. Along with simplifying operation, it contributes to the outstanding portability of a compact, lightweight body much smaller than conventional 35 mm SLRs.

HIGH-RESOLUTION 28-110 mm 4x ZOOM LENS

A large-diameter aspherical glass lens is a key to the image quality of the 28-110 mm 4x zoom lens as well as the compactness of the optical system. The 28 mm setting offers full wide-angle photography for outstanding results in indoor scenes, group portraits, expansive landscapes and architectural shots. Quickly and easily, the zooming lever moves the lens up to 110 mm for striking portraits and natural-looking candid photography. An optional teleconverter is available to increase the maximum focal length for full telephoto photography.

TWIN FLASH WITH GN25 POWER

In addition to its GN16 flashtube for wide-angle focal lengths, the IS-300 has a GN25 flashtube for telephoto shots. This combination offers a maximum flash range of 6.3 m with ISO100 color negative film and 12.6 m with ISO400. The changeover from one flashtube to the other is determined automatically according to the focal length.

HIGH-PRECISION AF SYSTEM WITH CMOS LINE SENSOR

About four times more sensitive than conventional AF sensors, the CMOS line sensor delivers improved autofocusing performance. It is so sensitive that the AF system works even in low light of EV-1 with ISO100 film. With this exceptional accuracy, it can pick out subjects in the dark, even when they are barely visible to the human eye.

INTELLIGENT VARIABLE-POWER FLASH SYSTEM

The Intelligent Variable-Power Flash System uses data from several sensors to determine the appropriate illumination. It fires automatically in both dim light and backlit situations - for example, when sunlight is filtered through trees. The system also minimizes over-exposure, while the Auto color-Balancing Flash detects the wavelength of fluorescent or other artificial lighting. The result is lifelike pictures that have an ideal color balance free from an unnatural cast. There is also a flashmatic control system that optimizes the illumination. Based on the distance to the subject, the appropriate flash intensity and aperture are set automatically.
Making it easy to take great flash pictures, the Intelligent Variable-Power Flash System has three flash modes.

Auto
  In low light or backlighting, the flash fires automatically, delivering the appropriate illumination for a correct exposure.

Red-Eye Reducing
  This mode minimizes the red-eye effect which spoils many flash portraits taken in low light. When the shutter button is pressed, a series of lower-powered pre-flashes fires before the main flash is triggered.

Fill-in
  The flash fires every time in this mode. It is especially helpful in eliminating unnatural shadows on a subject.

Note: The modes above are disengaged when the flash unit is closed.

DIRECT MODE SELECT BUTTON

By simply pressing the Direct Mode Select Button, photographers can explore the advantages of SLR performance, confident that the results will be all that they want. The icons are easy to understand, and there are four modes suited to the range of situations.

Stop Action Mode
  To freeze fast-moving subjects, the camera automatically picks the highest shutter speed up to 1/2000 sec., while the Predictive AF System keeps the subject in sharp focus.

Portrait Mode
  In this mode, the background is blurred to set off the subject in the foreground.

Night Scene Mode
  While the flash captures the subject in the foreground, the shutter stays open as long as 4 sec. to record the night scenery in the background.

Landscape Mode
  This mode is ideal for landscapes and group portraits with landscape scenery in the background.

PREDICTIVE AF SYSTEM

The Predictive AF System takes over automatically in the Stop Action Mode. Particularly helpful in recording sports events, it is used to follow a moving subject and keep it in sharp focus.

SUPER FP FLASH

In the Portrait Mode, the flash always fires unless it is closed. To ensure the shot comes out right, Super FP Flash takes over automatically when a high shutter speed is chosen (1/100-1/2000 sec.). At every speed, it automatically synchronizes the flash illumination with ambient light - a particularly important advantage in portraits shot in backlit conditions during the daytime. It also eliminates the facial shadows produced by side-lighting and makes the eyes glisten attractively. By blurring the background, this feature simplifies synchronized portraits taken in daylight, creating images that are striking and natural-looking.

CREATIVE FUNCTIONS

A wide range of features offer the control essential to creative expression.

Exposure Compensation
  The exposure can be adjusted ±2 EV in 1/2-step increments.

Aperture-Preferred AE
  For complete control over the depth of field, the aperture can be set to any F-stop - from the widest opening of F4.5-5.6 to the minimum of F22 - with a touch of a button.

Spot Metering
  An Olympus innovation pioneered with the OM-4 SLR, Spot Metering helps photographers ensure that the exposure reading is accurate for the part of the frame they want to emphasis. It is particularly useful when there are complications such as backlighting.

Long Time Mode
  The Long Time Mode is ideal for creative photography in night-time scenes that are difficult to capture in a programmed mode - for example, the flow of automobile taillights or fireworks against a dark sky. With the aperture locked at F8, the photographer can choose from shutter speeds of 1, 2, 4, 8, 15, 30 and 60 sec. The shutter can be triggered from a distance with the optional Remote Control RC-200.

INTEGRATED LENS CAP

Like the earlier IS-200, the IS-300 has an integrated lens cap that opens automatically when the power is turned on. This convenient feature eliminates the bother of removing the lens cap for every shot as well as the risk of losing it. The cap can be closed even when a filter has been added to the lens.

DIOPTRIC CORRECTION

Dioptric correction of -2 - +1 m-1 is built in to compensate for any eyesight problems.

OPTIONAL ACCESSORY FOR ENHANCED CREATIVE CONTROL

Remote Control RC-200
  The remote control triggers the shutter from as far as 5 m straight ahead of the subject or from 3.5 m at an angle of 50degrees or less on either side.


Source: olympus-global.com


Specifications

TypeFully automatic 35 mm autofocus single-lens-reflex camera with built-in 28mm to 110 mm zoom lens.
Film Format35 mm standard DX-coded film (24 x 36 mm).
LensOlympus lens (Filter available : 52mm filter diameter)
28mm to 110mm F4.5 to F5.6, 11 elements in 9 groups (5-group zoom construction)
ShutterElectronic control system, vertical focal plane shutter
Shutter speed: 1/2,000sec. - 4sec. Manual F8 : 1sec. - 60sec.
Flash-shutter SynchronizationUnder 1/100sec. - 1/2,000sec. (1/100sec. In Portrait Mode:)
FocusingTTL phase-difference detection system autofocus with focus lock. Auto focus beep available. Auxiliary flash activation in low light. (Available at distances up to 8m, determined under Olympus' test conditions.)
Focusing range: 0.75 m to infinity
Provided with Predictive Autofocus (in Stop Action Mode only)
Exposure Compensation±2EV (1/2- Step)
ViewfinderSingle-lens-reflex system, magnification ratio 0.72x (at 50mm)
Finder view field: 85% of actual view field
Viewfinder InformationAutofocus frame, Spot frame, Autofocus indicator, flash indicator(to be used as flash warning),
Exposure compensation/overexposure/underexposure warning
Diopter Adjustment-2 to +1 m-1 dioptry
Light Metering SystemTTL light metering system, Fuzzy-logic ESP light metering,
center-weighed average light metering, spot metering
Exposure Modes1) Program AE: Full-Auto, Stop Action, Portrait, Night Scene, Landscape
2) Aperture-Preferred Auto
3) Long Time(manual)
Exposure CounterProgressive, displayed on LCD panel
Film Speed RangeAutomatic setting with DX-coded film with ISO 25, 32, 50, 64, 100, 125, 200, 250, 400, 500, 800, 1000, 1600, 2000 or 3200. Other intermediate film speeds will be automatically set for next lower speed.
Film LoadingAutomatic loading. (Automatically advances to first frame when camera back cover is closed.)
Film AdvanceAutomatic film winding.
Film RewindAutomatic film rewind (automatic rewind activated at end of film, automatic rewind stop). Rewind possible at any point with rewind button.
Self-timerElectronic Self-timer with approx. 12 sec. delay.
Remote Control (Optional)Infrared remote control unit with approx. 3 sec. Delay.
FlashBuilt-in IVP (Intelligent Variable-Power) flash system.
Recycling TimeApprox. 0.2 to 3.9 sec. (at normal temperature)
Flash
Working
Range
With ISO 100
color negative
film
Wide angle: 5.0 m Telephoto : 6.3 m
With ISO 400
color negative
film
Wide angle: 10.0 m Telephoto : 12.6 m
Flash ModesAuto(Automatic flash activation in low-light, back light or other artificial lighting), Auto-S (Red-Eye Reducing, same as Auto otherwise),
Fill-in (forced activation), Off(When flash is retracted.)
Battery CheckDisplayed on LCD panel.
Power SourceTwo 3 V lithium battery (CR 123A or DL 123A).
Dimensions123 (W) x 88 (H) x 115 (D) mm
* Excluding protrusions.
Weight650 g * Without battery.
Source: olympus-global.com

Model

Serial number 5026178


Reference sites

olympus-global.com


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 CR123A battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


domingo, 13 de janeiro de 2019

Praktica MTL 50 (1985-1989)

Praktica MTL 50 (1985-1989)

#399
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

An entire generation of photographers learned the tricks of the trade on Praktica’s L range of cameras. From the late 1960s, the giant East German camera works of Pentacon in Dresden created a range of sturdy, simple 35mm SLR cameras that were sold in the hundreds of thousands on the other side of the Iron Curtain, giving countless photographers a cheap and reliable first step into proper photography.

Some of the most common of these were the MTL models. The MTL 5 and 3 were both released around 1984; classic-looking chrome and black leather screw-mount SLRs, manual shutter speeds up to 1/1000th of a second and metering to ISO 1600, flash sync at 1/125th of a second and usually partnered with a Zeiss Jena 50mm lens. It was no-frills, but a perfect student camera; the Praktica had a simple centre-weighted meter, but everything else was manual. If the batteries ran out of juice, you could still able to take pictures if you were confident enough to guess the exposure.

The MTL 3 and 5 were followed by the 5B in 1985, and, a few months later, the MTL 50, the last in a long line of Praktica cameras using the M42 lens mount. Some 25 years after production stopped, the MTL 50 is still a really useful tool for anyone wanting to get stuck into film photography.

Prakticas had an undeservedly bad rep in the 1980s and 90s – and often from people who’d never shot with one. Politics might have been part of it – consumer goods from the former Soviet bloc were usually derided for their crudity and lack of sophistication. But the MTL-marque Prakticas were simple and sturdy. The metal shutter at the camera’s heart makes a hell of a clack, but is incredibly reliable. As photographers developed their skills, and had more disposable income, many sold their Prakticas; used examples soon filled second hand camera stores and charity shops.

By the time the Praktica MTL 50 was released, all-manual cameras using screw lenses were decidedly old hat; the first generation of auto-focus cameras were hitting shops, and cameras were losing their metal shells in favour of more lightweight, plastic ones. About the only major update the MTL 50 had over previous models was replacing the metering match needle with LED lights showing under or overexposure.

I learned basic photography on a Praktica MTL 5B about 15 years ago, having decided to put my autofocus Canon EOS in a drawer. I used it for a couple of year before giving it to a friend so he could do the same; the Praktica introduced me to the screw-mount system, which allows you to build up a decent bunch of lenses (and spare bodies, if you want them) for next to nothing, and the Praktica was followed by several other camera bodies using screw mount lenses.

Then in 2012, I found a Praktica MTL 50 on eBay for £25; about half the price I paid for my MTL 5B more than a decade before. It seemed a bargain too good to ignore.

The Praktica might not be lightweight, quiet or bristling with features, but it’s one of the cheapest system SLR outfits you can buy. Nearly 300,000 of these were made up until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, and any that have managed to solider on til now are likely to give years more service.

So what’s so good about these old Prakticas? It’s the simplicity, on top of that legendary shutter (reputed to be cleared for over 100,00 exposures). The centre-weighted metering works perfectly fine in 95% of lighting conditions, and the placement of the shutter button on the front of the camera is a much more natural place for your fingers than the camera top plate; shoot a few films on a Praktica, and you’ll wonder why more camera designers didn’t do the same thing.

Pentacon also developed a special loading mechanism that helped make sure films were loaded safely. The film was placed behind a small plastic tab in the film chamber, and then fed onto the roll underneath two wires that help clamp down on the film as it’s wound on. It’s a pretty ingenious system, and one that makes mis-loading a Praktica pretty difficult.

Most of the time my travel camera is the Pentax ESII, one of the best screw mount cameras ever made, with aperture priority and a range of fantastic Takumar lenses. But the Praktica is a great spare body – during a recent trip to Barcelona and Morocco, I shot all of my Barcelona films on it, using the Pentacon Auto 50mm lens. Even with slide film, the Praktica’s meter was spot on, and the Pentacon Auto is a pretty capable lens. (Some of the other East German lenses, such as the Meyer Optic Orestor 100/2.8 and the Flektogon 35/2.4 are nothing less than outstanding).

I recently took the Praktica on a trip to New York for work as well; the one afternoon I had free to walk the city, camera in hand coincided with beautiful autumn sunshine. The Praktica’s Pentacon Auto lens paired well with Lomography 100 print film – though a lot of street photographers might have some issues with the noise the MTL 50 makes. This is not a quiet camera; the Praktica’s mirror makes one hell of a slap. If you’re wanting to take pictures on the sly, then you might want to use a rangefinder instead.

Tough, simple and reliable, Praktica MTLs are ripe for reappraisal. Get one while they’re still cheap.

Source: kosmofoto


Specifications

Shutter speeds: B;1-1000th
ASA: 12-1600
Self-timer
DOF/Aperture preview lever with battery-operated exposure guide LEDs
Front-mounted shutter release
42mm screw mount

Source: camerapedia


  • Producer: Kombinat VEB Pentacon Dresden
  • Responsible constructor: Rolf Noack
  • Production period: October 1985 to December 1989
  • No of produced cameras: 229,917


Technical properties of the camera

  • Shutter type: mechanically controlled vertical-moving metal-blade focal plane shutter
  • Exposure time (possible settings): B, 1/1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250,1/500, 1/1000
  • View finder: fixed eye-level view finder (Pentaprism) with new field lens with triple rangefinder wedge, truncated microprism screen, groundglass field, built-in shutter speed meter with two red LED
  • Mirror: instant-return mirror
  • Film transport / frame counter: quick-release lever (black), Pentacon Loading-System, fold-out rewind crank (black), auto-zeroing frame counter
  • Lens mount M42x1
  • Self timer: mechanically, approx. 10 sec
  • Battery: PX 28 or 4xLR44
  • Metering system: TTL-metering using stopped-down metering controlled by a switch beside the lens mount above the shutter release knob
  • Flash system: X-synchronisation (1/125), accessory shoe at the top of the pentaprism, none coaxial flash socket
  • Flash indication: none
  • Aperture reflection into view finder: none
  • General comments: smooth, unruffled leatherette with stampings, complete black finish

Source: praktica-collector.de

Model

Serial number 600590

Reference sites

camerapedia

kosmofoto

praktica-collector.de


Manual

English manual


Batteries


V28 PX 6V battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sexta-feira, 11 de janeiro de 2019

Dacora Daci (1948)

Dacora Daci (1948)
#398
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Daci is a medium format box camera made by Dacora and introduced in 1948.

Early versions (1948) of the camera used simple wire clips to hold the front on, later version (1952) with badge around lens. Red, black, gray and green color varieties are also known.

Source: camerapedia

La Dacora Daci en un principio parece una cámara de cajón del montón, pero una vez que se tiene en las manos, uno se da cuenta de que no es así. Y es que la particularidad de la Daci es que está completamente hecha de Alumino, cosa bastante poco común en su época (1950) cuando el material que primaba, y sobre todo para las cámaras de cajón, era la bakelita. Así pues, esta cámara está hecha con materiales "nobles" que además requerían de la maquinaria al efecto para mecanizarlos. Dacora comenzó su andadura bajo el nombre "Dangelmeier & Co" en Munich en 1946 y cesó su producción en 1972. La Daci fue su segundo modelo, que podía comprarse por unos 7,50 marcos (DM) de la época.

Por lo demás, sí que hay que considerar a la Daci una cámara de bajas pretensiones, ya que como era común en las cámaras de cajón, no tiene gran cosa. El objetivo es un simple menisco fijo y su cierre simple tan sólo ofrece dos posibilidades de disparo que vemos algo toscamente pintadas en blanco al lado del disparador como "Z" y "M" (Zeit / Moment - Tiempo/Instante).

Aún así, hay que reconocerle un muy buen acabado y buena presencia. Tiene su nombre cromado en el frontal y por detrás está la ventana para controlar el paso de foto que se cubre con una chapa metálica igualmente cromada. Todo un lujo! También en la trasera, podemos ver los restos casi intactos de una pegatina publicitaria de la tienda donde se vendió: "Photo Rham, Frankfurt a.M.", o sea Frankfurt en el Main (hay otro Frankfurt más pequeño en la orilla del Oder, cerca de la frontera polaca).

La cámara es de muy reducidas dimensiones, lo que haría esperar el uso de rollo 127. Sin embargo, la Daci hace uso del rollo 120, tomando fotografías en formato 6x6. Debido a éste formato cuadrado (y a la construcción compacta de la cámara), sólo dispone de un visor superior por encima del objetivo. Igualmente dispone sólo de una rosca de trípode en su base y en su parte superior incorpora un asa de cuero. La funda de la cámara es igualmente de cuero, y al verla nos recuerda a las usadas por las cámaras de cajón de la preguerra.

Para abrir la cámara, hay que liberar dos enganches laterales igualmente cromados. También están cromados los embellecedores del objetivo y visor. No así la rueda de alumino para pasar la foto. Debajo del disparador encontramos también, como es común, la rosca para latiguillos o temporizadores.

La Daci se puede adquirir por muy poco dinero, y en general su aspecto “Gotham City” y sus materiales me evocan a la Bilora Bella, aunque se trate de dos tipos de cámara completamente diferentes.

Hay otros modelos existentes de Dacis, entre otros algunos coloreados como la "Daci Royal". La propia Dacora no llegó a fabricar muchos modelos; entre ellos podéis ver también en mi coleccón a la Subita que era un modelo económico de la casa Dacora.

Una cámara muy simple pero bonita, que ha aguantado excelentemente el paso de sus ya 60 años.

Source: camarassinfronteras.com


Specifications

Film 120 roll, picture size 6x6cm
Lens: simple meniscus f/9
Shutter: rotary, one speed 1/40 (instant) and time
Body: metal

Source: camerapedia

Hersteller Dacora - Kamerawerk, Reutlingen
Typ Dacora Daci Royal (rot)
Kameratyp Boxkamera
Filmtyp 6 x 6 cm, Rollfilm
Baujahr 1951
Optik Meniskus 1:9
Verschluss Einfachverschluss 1/40 und "B"
Belichtungsmessung ohne
Fokussierung Manuell, 1,50 m - ∞
Blitzanschluss PC-Buchse an der Seite links

Source: lippisches-kameramuseum.de


Model


Reference sites

camerapedia

camarassinfronteras.com

lippisches-kameramuseum.de


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

terça-feira, 18 de dezembro de 2018

Canon EOS 3000 (1999)

Canon EOS 3000 (1999)
#397
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

A compact, lightweight, low-priced SLR camera. Successor to the EOS5000, but with greatly expanded basic functions. The camera incorporates the Mode Dial and most other basic features of the EOS Kiss/EOS REBEL XS/EOS500 and includes six-zone evaluative metering linked to three focusing points. In addition, the flash is linked to the measurement point so that during shooting the flash out-put level is constantly adjusted for optimum exposure control. For reasons of cost, the flash unit is manual pop-up/retractable head type. The EOS3000 is compatible with system accessories for the Kiss and New Kiss. The high-quality design has a feel of genuine elegance.

Source: global.canon

The EOS 3000 is an autofocus SLR for 35mm film introduced by Canon in 1999. It was sold as the EOS 88 in Asia. (It was not sold in the US.) The pentamirror viewfinder and manually-activated popup flash helped keep this a lower-cost model; but a full range of autoexposure modes were included, including off-the-film flash exposure setting. Film transport is motorized and the camera requires two 3-volt CR123 lithium batteries to operate.

Source: camera-wiki.org


Specifications

Type: 35mm focal-plane shutter, multi-mode AF SLR camera
Normal Lens: Canon EF lenses
Picture Size: 24 x 36 mm (panorama image approximately 13 x 36 mm using panorama adapter PA-1000) (Japanese model only)
Lens Mount: EF mount
AF System: TTL-SIR (TTL secondary image phase differential detection). AF modes: One-shot AF, One-shot AF/Predictive AI servo AF automatic switching, and manual focus. Multi-BASIS (1+1 array). AF operating range EV1.5-18 (ISO 100). AF in-focus indicators: LCD indicator inside the viewfinder, plus in-focus beeper (tone on/off selection is available in the Creative Zone).
Shutter: Vertical travel, focal plane electronic shutter. 1/2000-30 sec. in 1/2-stop increments, Bulb. X-sync at 1/90 sec. (hot shoe). In shutter-priority AE and manual exposure control mode; electronic dial provides 1/2- stop increments shutter speed setting. In other modes: Shutter speed is set automatically by the camera. Built-in electronic self-timer. Camera-shake warning in Full Auto and IS mode.
Viewfinder: Fixed eye-level pentamirror. 0.7x Magnification and 90% coverage horizontally and vertically.
Viewfinder Information: On the screen: Center AF mark, wide AF frame, and partial metering circle. Below the screen (seven-segment LCD display): Shutter speed (with camera-shake and out-of-range warnings) and aperture. Below the screen (LCD mask indicators): AE lock, red-eye reduction, flash charge completed, flash-use warning for low-light (blinking), exposure indicators (in 1/2-stop increments), AE exposure compensation amount, manual exposure, red-eye reduction lamp progress, AF in-focus (blinks if AF fails), manual in-focus.
Exposure Compensation: Manual setting ±2 EV in 1/2-steps. Operating range EV2-20 (ISO 100, f/1.4).
External LCD Information: Aperture, ISO mark, shutter-speed (ISO film speed/battery-check (bc) indicator, battery check level), exposure indicator (in 1/2-stop increments, ±2 stops) (exposure compensation amount/metered manual/red-eye reduction lamp), film status (loaded/not loaded/AL failure), film counter (multiple exposure setting/multiple exposures count (counts down)/beeper setting/self-timer operation (count down)), self-timer, beeper, red-eye reduction, multiple exposure
Metering & Exposure Control: Composite SPC for TTL full-aperture metering (six-zone evaluative metering and partial metering :9.5% of viewfinder at center). Picture-taking modes: Intelligent program AE (program shift enabled), Shutter speed- priority AE, Aperture-priority AE, Full-auto mode (intelligent AE), four Programmed Image Control modes (Portrait/Night Scene/Close-up/Sports), Auto-DEP, TTL program flash AE, A-TTL program flash AE, metered manual. AE lock enabled (button- operated). ISO film speed range: ISO 25-5000 in 1/3-stop increments, set automatically with DX code. ISO 6-6400 in 1/3-stop increments manual settings. Multiple exposures: Max nine multiple exposures (cancels automatically at completion or manually before completion). Exposure Compensation: Manual setting ±2 EV in 1/2-stop increments. Metering range: EV2-20 (ISO 100, f/1.4).
Built-in Flash: Retractable, located on pentamirror hump. TTL auto flash control. Off-the-film metering (linked to three weighted focusing points). Measurement Conditions Creative mode: Fires automatically when flash is up. Full auto/Image select mode: Fires automatically when flash is up, under low-light or backlit conditions. Flash Sync Speed Program AE: Automatically set to 1/90 sec Shutter priority AE, Manual: Set as needed at 1/90 or slower (in 1/2-stop increments). Aperture priority AE: Automatically set from 30 to 1/90 seconds Daylight sync available, red-eye reduction lamp provided (also functions as AF assist beam lamp) Guide number: 12 (ISO 100) With External Flash: External flash has priority, built-in flash operation disabled. EZ/E series strobe: A-TTL autoflash. EX series strobe, ML-3: TTL autoflash
Autodate Feature: No date; month, day, year; day, month, year; year, month day (Japan and QD models only)
Power Source: Two 3V CR123A or DL123A lithium batteries
Film Loading & Advance: Align film leader at mark, then close the camera back for prewind loading. Film rewinds as each shot is exposed. Built-in motor for automatic winding/rewinding. Film advance: Automatic. Single-frame and continuous (1 fps). Automatically rewinds film leader into cartridge when designated number of frames have been exposed (midroll rewind available).
Frame Counter: Counts down on external LCD panel (counts up during prewinding)
Dimensions & Weight: 145 x 92 x 61.9mm, 345 g (QD model: 360 g)

Source: global.canon


Model

Serial number 3716638


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

global.canon


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 CR123A battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



domingo, 16 de dezembro de 2018

Minolta Dynax 303si (1999)

Minolta Dynax 303si (1999)
#396
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Dynax 303si is a autofocus 35mm SLR film camera manufactured by Minolta and introduced in 1999. It is also known as the α-360si (Alpha 360si) as well as the Maxxum QTsi.

The electronically controlled vertical travelling focal-plane shutter has speed of 30s to 1/2000 of a sec. with a flash sync of 1/90. The program exposure mode contains 5 separate modes including portrait, landscape, clo
se-up, sport and night portrait. The metering is TTL based on a silicon photo cell with a range of 4 to 20 EV (ISO 100, f/1.4). It can use DX encoded films with speeds of 25 to 5000 ISO. Non-DX films will use the previous films ISO setting. A electronic self-timer mode is available with a delay of 10 seconds.

The film transport is motorized with film advance settings of single or a continuous drive speed of up to 1fps. Rewinding the film is automatic at the end of the roll, but a manual rewind is also possible before the end of the roll. The built-in flash has a GN of 12. Flash modes include auto, auto red eye, fill flash, fill flash red eye, and flash off. An AF illumiator is also on the flash, that enables more precise focusing in darker conditions. The camera is powered by two CR2 battery.


Source: camera-wiki.org

Specifications

General
Name Minolta Dynax 303si , α-360si (Japan), Maxxum QTsi (USA)
Mount type A-mount
Supported lenses classic, xi
Release year 1999
Status discontinued

Auto-focus
AF sensors 1 line
AF range [EV] −1 – 18
AF modes AF-A, AF-S, AF-C
AF assist light no

Features
Eye-start no
Custom functions
Other features

Metering
Metering modes 2 segments
Metering range [EV] (with spot) 4 – 20 (-)
Auto Exposure Lock button no
Exposure modes P
Subject programs portrait, landscape, closeup, sport, night portrait
Exposure compensation [stops] (steps [stops])

Flash
Flash shoe type iISO
Accessory shoe cap SC-1000
Flash modes normal, red-eye reduction, slow sync
Flash metering CW-TTL
Requires D flash unit no
Flash guide number [m]/ coverage [mm] 12/28
X-Sync speed [s] 1/90
High Speed Sync no
Wireless flash yes
Wireless x-sync speed [s] 1/45
Wireless HSS no
Ratio flash control no
Flash exposure compensation [stops] (steps [stops])
Studio flash socket no
Compatible with DR-1000 no

Viewfinder
Viewfinder type pentamirror
Viewfinder coverage 90%
Viewfinder magnification 0.75×
Eye relief [mm]/ from frame [mm] unknown
Screens G (default)
Diopter adjustment [diopters] -1
Eyepiece cup fixed
Viewfinder accessory compatible no

Shooting
Frame rate [fps] 1
Frame rate with AF [fps] unknown
Shutter speed (still) [s] 30 – 1/2000
Timer for Bulb exposures no
Self-timer [s] 10
Bracketing frames (stops)
Multiple exposures
Remote release socket
Wireless remote release
Release priority no
Depth of field preview no
Aperture can be changed during depth of field preview no
Silent depth of field preview no

Film features
Leader out no
ISO override no
IR safe no

Power
Batteries 2× CR2
Battery pack BP-100 (4× AA)
Vertical grip
External power supply

Construction and accessories
Weather sealing no
Mount material polycarbonate
Weight [g] 340
Standard accessories strap, body cap, batteries
Data saver
Date back QD model

Source: mhohner.de


Model

Serial number 00201520


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

mhohner.de


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 CR2 batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

segunda-feira, 10 de dezembro de 2018

Zeiss Ikon CONTINA IIa (type 527/24) (1956-1958)

Zeiss Ikon CONTINA IIa
#395
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Zeiss Ikon is a German company that was formed in 1926 by the merger of four camera makers (Contessa-Nettel, Ernemann, Goerz and Ica), and an infusion of capital by Zeiss[1]. The company formed one part of the Carl Zeiss Foundation, another part being the optical company Carl Zeiss. Logically, most of the Zeiss Ikon cameras were equipped with Carl Zeiss lenses; and the formerly independent companies, in particular Goerz, had to shut down their own lens manufacture.

The merged company was also obliged to use Compur shutters for 80% of its cameras. Thus only the simplest cameras could get cheaper shutters like the Klio. Soon AG Hahn für Optik und Mechanik, Kassel, and Goerz Photochemisches Werk GmbH, Berlin, joined the Zeiss Ikon syndicate. Both companies, Zeiss Ikon and Hahn, were also in the business of producing keys, latches an lock cylinders. This business was more and more concentrated in the former optical factories of Goerz in Berlin.

The group became one of the big companies in the photo technology capital Dresden, with plants in Stuttgart and Berlin. It continued several products of its constituents for a while, but also created new ones like the quality folder Ikonta and the medium format rangefinder camera Super Ikonta. Until WWII Zeiss Ikon was the world's market leading maker of 8mm movie cameras. In addition to cameras and lenses, Zeiss Ikon also produced some optics for medical applications.

West Germany: Zeiss Ikon AG Stuttgart

After World War II Zeiss Ikon was split into a West German and an East German part. It was reformed in West Germany, and trademark disputes followed with the part that was left in East Germany. Stuttgart became the company's domicile. Zeiss Ikon merged in the mid 1960s with Voigtländer, another important German manufacturer, and one that had been controlled by the Zeiss Foundation since 1956.

The product lines of Zeiss Ikon Stuttgart were different from the East German company's products. The Ikophot light meters were made in Stuttgart.

Zeiss Ikon ceased the production of cameras in 1972. This was a great shock for the entire German camera industry. Parts of the Zeiss Ikon product line then went to Rollei, and part of the know-how was used to revive the Contax name in collaboration with the Japanese maker Yashica.

Before reunification the whole Zeiss Ikon keys, latches & locking cylinder business was separated into a separate company.

East Germany: VEB Zeiss Ikon Dresden

Postwar production, begun early in May 1945, was soon interrupted as several factories were closed for dismantling their production machines. The machines were given as reparation to Soviet camera makers that had suffered demolition during the war. The production of the sophisticated Contax rangefinder cameras was prepared in Dresden and relaunched with new machines in Jena before all the machines were transferred to the Soviet camera maker Kiev. In 1948 the East German part of Zeiss Ikon became state owned. Production and development of Ernemann projectors and movie cameras were continued from 1949. Camera production was continued in 1947 with the Tenax and the Ikonta models. Soon the company's stock of leaf shutters was running out. In 1950 it could produce its own shutters since it took over the shutter production of Balda and the shutter factory of Mimosa. In 1952 the Tempor was Zeiss Ikon's first own leaf shutter development, followed in 1954 by the Prestor, the fastest leaf shutter at this time.

In 1948 the company could introduce its advanced SLR model, the Contax S. Since there were suits about trade mark names with the West German Zeiss Ikon AG, VEB Zeiss Ikon was renamed VEB Kinowerke Dresden in 1958. Later it became the main part of the East German combine Pentacon.

After German reunification
Today Carl Zeiss is reviving the Zeiss Ikon name. The new Zeiss Ikon camera, introduced at the 2004 Photokina show, is a rangefinder camera with Leica M-mount, developed in Germany and built by Cosina in Japan. Like the Contax G1 and G2), it has lenses made in both Japan (by Cosina) and Germany.

Source: camera-wiki.org

Manufactured from 1956 to 1958, this well-made 35mm viewfinder camera was fitted with either Novicar Anastigmat or Novar Anastigmat lenses in a Prontor SVS shutter.

The camera has an uncoupled exposure meter. Early examples have a twin range meter like this one.

You can identify it as a twin-range meter because the cover flap over the meter cell has a slot machined through it. It is normally closed for bright conditions, so it lets through less light, and you read the meter on the high scale.

In lower light conditions, you open the flap to let more light act on the selenium cell, and you make your readings on the low-light scale.

Later examples like this one below, have a single range meter. The meter flap looks much the same, but is actually a cover, and blocks all the light. The meter flap must be opened to take a reading.

Source: retinarescue.com

There appears to be confusion as to the correct name of this camera, which identifies itself as simply Contina (on the lens bezel). Some sources say it's a Contina II, while others claim the model is a Contina IIa.

Ivor Matanle's book Collecting and Using Classic Cameras, explains that the camera is often referred to as the IIa, with the a having been added by camera buffs to differentiate this (527/24) model from an earlier folding (524/24) camera also called the Contina II. Ivor's observation is incorrect, because there were actually two 527/24 models - the II and IIa - and while their differences are acknowledged, reviewers often assume the IIa was a later version of the II, rather than a different model.

The facts are, the IIa was the first model, and Zeiss (not collectors) added an a to the name to distinguish the camera from the 524/24 folding Contina II. The 527/24 Contina II followed the IIa in 1956, with some logic to Zeiss dropping the a from its name, because production of the 524/24 folding Contina II had ceased in 1953. The II and IIa had quite a few significant differences.

Contina IIa (527/24)
1954 - 56
Look for
• small slots in meter cell flap
• dual range meter with scoop cut from outer meter dial, which reveals a scale (green for flap closed, and black for flap open)
• EV number scale in meter window
• lens mount front plate has very shallow horizontal grooves
• smaller viewfinder window with no frame around.

Contina II (527/24)
1956 - 58
Look for
• no slots in meter cell flap (its just a cover)
• single range meter
• no scale in meter window because its a match-needle system rather than a pointer
• lens mount front plate is smooth
• larger viewfinder window with surrounding frame.

There was a further Contina II from 1958, but this was also known as the Contina-matic, had a coupled exposure meter, and therefore no top-plate dials. It's clearly a different camera, and I haven't included details because the point of this table is to show the a designation pertains to one specific model.

This Contina II is a completely manual viewfinder camera and was fitted with either an f/3.5 Novar or f/2.8 Novicar Anastigmat 45mm lens with a Prontor SVS shutter. My understanding is that Novar and Novicar were names owned by Zeiss, but the lenses were not actually made by the company. My camera has the faster f/2.8 lens.

The camera has an uncoupled exposure meter. It works like a hand-held; turn the dial to match the needles, and read off the recommended aperture / shutter speed combinations for transfer to the camera lens settings.

A nice feature is that the rewind knob extends away from the camera body as it is turned - making it easier to operate.

One source reports that the camera cost £43 15s 1d new, which would be equivalent to about 3 weeks average UK wages.



Specifications

Viewfinder: Simple. No parallax markings. Image about 2/3rds of natural size.
Focus: Manual scale focusing.
Lens: Novicar Anastigmat f2.8 45mm comprising 3 elements.
Close Focus: 4'.
Diaphragm: Five blades, stopping down to f/22.
Shutter: B, 1, 1/2nd, 1/4th, 1/8th, 1/15th, 1/30th, 1/60th, 1/125th and 1/300th. The shutter can be set at M or X synch. Prontor SVS five-blade leaf shutter.
Cable Release: Standard socket in shutter release button.
Meter: Uncoupled Selenium.
Exposure: Manual, read from meter scale.
Film Speed: From ASA 5 - 640.
Filter Size: 27mm screw in.
Flash: Cold shoe and PC terminal. M and X sync.
Film Advance: Long stroke lever.
Frame Counter: Set manually with auto count-up.
Rewind: Via crank and separate bottom release button.
Back Opening: Lever.
Size: 120 x 65 x 85mm (W x D x H),
Weight: 567g,

Source: camera.portraits.srv2.com


Model

Mine is, according to the first source, a IIa. But it's a model II according to the second source.
It as the serial nunmber K64395.


Reference sites

camera.portraits.srv2.com

camera-wiki.org

retinarescue.com


Manual

English manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

sábado, 8 de dezembro de 2018

Polaroid EE33 (1976-1977)

Polaroid EE33 (1976-1977)
#394
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 


Source:

Specifications

Name : EE33
Brand : Polaroid®
Type : Type 80 film
Production years : 1976-1977
Lens : N/C
Shutter : N/C
Speeds : N/C
Aperture : f/9.2
Type of focus : N/C
ISO : N/C
Rarity : N/C
Description : N/C

Source: polaroid-passion


Model


Reference sites

polaroid-passion


Manual


Film
Polaroid Type 80 film

Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

domingo, 2 de dezembro de 2018

Porst Compact Reflex SP (1976)

Porst Compact Reflex SP (1976)
#393
This photo is from the copy I own

Gently donated by Mrs Isabel Alber. Thank you!

History and technical features 

Photo Porst was a German distributor and retailer of many brands of cameras. It was founded in 1919 by Hanns Porst in Nuremberg, Germany. For many years Porst bought cameras from other manufacturers, among them Adox, Agfa, Balda, Braun, Dacora, and Franka, and rebadged them. In the early years, from the 1930s to the end of the 1950s, it used the Hapo brand, an acronym of Hans Porst. Later on, the house brand cameras appeared under the PORST name, e.g. PORST compact reflex or PORST 135 BS. In the 1970s the house-brand Carena was added. A lot of these later house-brand cameras were produced by Cosina, but also by Balda, Franka, Fuji, Mamiya, Taron, and Yashica.

By 1996, the Porst chain of camera stores was Germany's largest photographic retailer, and in that year it was purchased by a Belgian investment group. In 2001, ownership was transferred to Pixelnet. The following year, the company became insolvent and the rights to the name Porst were sold to the German group Ringfoto.

Source: camera-wiki.org


Specifications

Porst Compact Reflex SP, also known as the Cosina CSR, 1976. Electronic-shutter M42 mount 35mm SLR.

Source: flickr.com


Model

Seral number 7833172


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

flickr.com

Manual

Cosina CSR manual in english


Batteries

2 LR44 batteries

Film
Fujicolor Superia 100/36

Pictures taken with this machine


Porst Compact Reflex SP sample 1

Porst Compact Reflex SP sample 2

Porst Compact Reflex SP sample 3

Videos



segunda-feira, 26 de novembro de 2018

Petri 7S (1963-1973)

Petri 7S (1963-1973)
#392
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Petri 7s was introduced by Petri in 1963 as a variant of the Petri 7 which was introduced in 1961. The main difference being an improved film advance lever and frame counter. It took 35mm film, had a coupled rangefinder, and an around-the-lens selenium cell light meter. Production ended in 1973.

Compared to its predecessor, the 7s is very advanced. It has ATL (around the lens) selenium metering with a match-needle visible both in the viewfinder as well as the top of the camera. From the 7s came the compact Petri Color 35, which was wildly popular when released in 1968

The 7s was available with either a 45mm f1.8 or f2.8 lens. The shutter had speeds up to 1/500, and the viewfinder used Petri's Green-o-Matic system.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

Manufacturer: Petri Camera Company
Place of Manufacture: Japan
Date of Manufacture: 1963 – 1976
Focusing System: Fully coupled rangefinder
Rangefinder: Helicoid-type Coupled Rangefinder
Focusing: 2.65 ft to Infinity.
Lens: 45mm f/2.8 (4 elements in 3 groups), coated, 52mm filter thread mount; 45mm f/1.8 (6 elements), coated, 52mm filter thread mount
Shutter: Petri MVE leaf (in-lens) shutter
Shutter speeds: 1 – 1/500 + B + self-timer
Metering System: Around the lens (ATL) selenium manual metering cell
Aperture: f/2.8~16; f/1.8~16
Flash: “Cold” flash shoe; PC external flash connection
Flash type selector: M – X
Film type: Standard 135 (35mm) film
Film Transport: Single-Stroke (180 degree) rapid transport lever.
Battery type: n/a
Dimensions and weight: 132 × 79 × 72mm xxxg / 132 × 79 × 72mm 635g

Source: lomography.pt


Model

The model i own as the f/2.8 lens


Reference sites

camerapedia

lomography.pt


Manual

English manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos





sexta-feira, 16 de novembro de 2018

Rank Mamiya (1963)

Rank Mamiya (1963)
#391
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Also called ALDIS RANGER 35 or MAMIYA RANGER 35.
It is in fact a MAMIYA 4B renamed under the trademark RANK, for the British market.
It belongs to a line of medium range small rengefinder cameras, whose precursor was the MAMIYA RUBIS in 1959.
The manufacture is neat, but much lighter than for  the previous ranges.

Source: collection-appareils.fr

MAMIYA RUBY
In September 1959, Mamiya introduced another leaf shutter 35mm camera, the Mamiya Ruby. It was a front-lens focusing linked rangefinder with a point matching exposure meter, read in a dial on top of the camera, not through the lens (see picture at right). It had a 48mm f/2.8 Mamiya-Sekor lens. A more advanced version, featuring lens and aperture control, with an f/1.9 Mamiya-Sekor lens, was introduced in May 1960. The Ruby was to become the style basis for several Mamiya rangefinders.
Building on the Ruby line was the Mamiya M3, a less expensive cousin, introduced in May 1961. It featured a fully synchro flash contact, shutter speeds from 1 to 1/500, and came with a fixed 48mm Mamiya-Kominar f/2.0 lens. Yet another related camera, the Mamiya 4B, released in 1963, came with a selenium-cell meter, a fixed 40mm Mamiya-Kominar f/2.8 lens and a much more limited shutter (1/4 - 1/250). Similar Mamiya rangefinders were often rebranded as Rank Mamiya cameras when sold in the U.K.

Source: mamiya35collectors.com


Specifications

35mm rangefinder for 24 x 36 images. Fully mechanical with selenium cell.

Quick-cocking lever, with mechanical counter, at its base.
Knob with rewind crank, accessory shoe; Cell dial scaled in IL (1 to 11).
40 mm collimated frame viewfinder with parallax correction marks.
Rectangular rangefinder image of comfortable size and well contrasted yellow.
Selenium cell on the front.
Adjusting of the film sensitivity on the shutter.
MAMIYA lens SEKOR 1: 2,8-22 / 40mm
SEIKOSHA shutter from ¼ second to 1 / 250th + B
Front-mounted flash sync.

Source: collection-appareils.fr


Model

Serial number 104947


Reference sites

52rangefinders.blogspot.com

collection-appareils.fr

mamiya35collectors.com


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



domingo, 4 de novembro de 2018

Canon AE-1 (1976-1984)

Canon AE-1 (1976-1984)
#390
Esta fotografia é do exemplar que possuo

Características

The Canon AE-1 is a 35mm film SLR camera with shutter-priority automatic exposure and manual override, produced by Canon in Japan and produced between 1976-1984.

By using a microprocessor, Canon was able to simplify the design, and by using a highly automated production process, they were able to keep costs low. The result was one of the first affordable TTL autoexposure cameras to hit the market. After its introduction in 1976, the Canon AE-1 quickly became a very popular camera worldwide. The AE-1 was replaced a few years later by the AE-1 Program.

Fonte: Camerapedia


Especificações

Lens: Canon FD 50mm f/1.4 SC
Mount: Canon FD breech-lock mount, accepts New FD (FDn) lenses also; filter thread: 52mm
This is the Standard lens, other normal lens is Canon FD 50mm f/1.4 SSC. There are many Canon lenses for the camera
Aperture: up to f/22, setting: ring and scale on the lens for manual setting
Focus range: 0.6-10m +inf
DOF pre-view: button on the right of the lens flange
Lens release: press the silver button on the lens and turn to anti-clockwise
Focusing: manual, via Canon standard split image rangefinder with microprism collar
Shutter: cloth focal plane electronic shutter travelled horizontally, speeds: 2-1/1000 +B; setting : dial on left of the top plate
Shutter release: on the top plate, w/ cable release socket, w/ lock lever, L means the shutter locked; when on A, pressing half way, the meter is readable in the finder
Cocking lever: 120° stroke (partial strokes enabled). Ready position at 30°.
Canon Winder A optional for power winding
Frame counter: counts up, auto-reset, on the top plate
Viewfinder: fixed eye-level SLR pentaprism, split-image rangefinder encircled by microprism rangefinder at center with a fresnel matte screen. Exposure meter needle, aperture scale, over-exposure warning zone, stopped-down aperture metering needle and battery check indicator, and under-exposure warning LED and Manual control (M) signal are visible
Exposure meter: center-weighted CdS meter with shutter-priority automatic exposure, full-aperture TTL metering
Film speed range: 25-3200 ASA; setting: lift the knurled ring on the winding button and then set. If the speeds dial turns when you setting the ASA, turn it to B or 1000.
Metering range: EV 1-18 at 100 ASA/ISO
Exposure setting: shutter priority auto; set to A, while pressing the AE lock button on the lens turn the aperture ring of the lens; needle pointing along a vertical f-stop scale on the right side of the viewfinder. Shutter release lock lever must be on A.
Manual: TTL stopped-down match needle manual metering
Back-light control switch: silver button, on the right of the lens flange
Exposure compensation range: +1.5 EV.
Exposure preview switch: black button, on the right of the lens flange
Re-wind lever: folding cranck, on right of the top plate
Re-wind release: small knob on the bottom plate
Flash PC socket: Flash sync 1/60, auto-switching
Hot-shoe: the dedicated flash units are Speedlites
Self-timer: release lock lever sets to S , then release the shutter, the red LED blinks when self timer working; before the shutter release, you can cancel it by pressing the battery check button
Back cover: hinged, remowable, w/ memory slot
Engraving on the bottom plate: Canon, Japan
Tripod socket: ¼"
Strap lugs
Body: metal; Weight: 798g (with standard lens)
Battery: 4LR44 6V battery or 4x LR44 1.5 V batteries
Attention: the camera is fully battery dependant
Battery chamber: on front of the camera
Battery check: black button beside the re-wind lever. If the battery is in very good condition, in the viewfinder, metering needle stays below the index near 5.6. If it stays on index, it is in low condition and over the index the battery must be replaced.
On/off switch: shutter release lock lever must be on L
The winder terminals and coupling sockets are in the bottom plate.
Serial no. on the top plate
Date code: inside the film spool compartment, eg. R 217 means the production year 1977 and month.

Fonte: Camerapedia


Modelo

A minha possui o n.º de série 1886762. lente possui o n.º de série 133918.

Foi fabricada em outubro de 1978 uma vez que possui o código interno S1035. Ver Canon date codes: bobatkins.com

É o segundo exemplar que possuo.


Sítios de referência

Camerapedia

Canon date codes: bobatkins.com


Manual

Manual em inglês


Baterias
6V battery


Filme


Fotografias tiradas com esta máquina


Vídeos