quinta-feira, 19 de setembro de 2019

Pentax K1000 (1976-1997)

Pentax K1000 (1976-1997)
#434
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

K1000 is a 35mm film SLR camera made by Pentax and produced between 1976–97. Its design descends from the original Spotmatic series of screw-mount SLRs introduced in the 1960s.

An affordable camera for the amateur photographer, it was a fully mechanical, manual camera designed without any program modes. It survived much longer than originally intended and became the archetypal "student's camera." The K1000 was equipped with all features required for manual photography: a TTL metering system, wide-ranging shutter speeds from 1/1000 to 1 s, and the ability to use all the available K-mount lenses made by Pentax and licensees such as Ricoh and Cosina. The K1000 omitted some features found on more advanced models, such as depth-of-field preview, self-timer, and separate meter on/off switch.

Despite its great popularity and longevity of the same basic design, Pentax finally ceased production of the K1000 after more than 20 years in 1997.

The K series evolved from the classic Spotmatic SP 1000, in fact the K1000 itself is essentially a Spotmatic with a bayonet rather than M42×1 screw mount.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

Lens release: lever on the right lower side of the lens mount, slide downward and turn the lens counter clockwise, when mounting the lens the red marks of the lens and the camera must be aligned
Focusing: manual front focusing, via Fresnel matte screen, ring and scale window on the lens
Shutter: horizontally traveling, rubberized silk focal plane, speeds: 1/1000–1 s +B; setting: speed dial knob on the top plate
Shutter release: on the top plate, with cable release socket
Cocking lever: also winds the film, short stroke, retractable, on the right of the top plate
Frame counter: additive type, auto-reset, window on the cocking lever
Viewfinder: eye level SLR pentaprism, needle index of exposure meter visible in it
Exposure meter: full frame averaging TTL metering with built-in coupled match-needle meter ASA range: 20–3200, setting: ring and window on the speed dial, lift and turn
Exposure setting: manual, turn the speed dial or aperture ring until the needle aligned to the center of the index, in the finder
Rewind: folding crank on the top plate, turns when winding
Rewind release: a button on the bottom plate
Flash PC socket: left lower front side of the camera, w/ removable lid, X-Sync. 1/60, red X mark on the speed dial
Hot-shoe
Self-timer: none
Back cover: hinged, opens by lifting the re-wind lever
Tripod socket: 1/4 in
Strap lugs
Battery: 1.5 V LR44 alkaline or SR44 silver oxide (only for exposure meter)
Battery chamber: on the bottom plate
Attention: leave the lens cap on when you are not using the camera, there is no on-off switch for the exposure meter, so it works continuously

Source: camerapedia


Model

Serial number 7868338


Reference sites

camerapedia

Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 LR44 batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos




quarta-feira, 11 de setembro de 2019

Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (1959-1962)

Zeiss Ikon Contaflex Super (1959)
#433
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

This is a Zeiss-Ikon Contaflex Super, a 35mm Single Lens Reflex leaf shutter camera made by Zeiss-Ikon AG in Stuttgart, West Germany between the years 1959 and 1962.  It was part of the long lived Contaflex series that saw many variations between the original Contaflex I in 1953 all the way to the Contaflex S from about 1970.  The Super, as it’s name implies was a rather high spec version of the camera, featuring a coupled selenium exposure meter with match needle readout in the viewfinder, and a 4-element 50mm Tessar lens with interchangeable front elements.  With the use of Pro-Tessar bayonet mount lenses, the Contaflex had available wide angle and telephoto lenses.

Source: mikeeckman.com


Specifications

Film Type: 135 (35mm)
Lens: 50mm f/2.8 Carl Zeiss Tessar coated 4-elements
Lens Mount: Contaflex Bayonet (front element only)
Focus: 2.5 feet to Infinity
Viewfinder: Fixed SLR Pentaprism
Shutter: Synchro-Compur Leaf
Speeds: B, 1 – 1/500 seconds
Exposure Meter: Coupled Selenium Cell w/ viewfinder and top plate match needle
Battery: None
Flash Mount: Coldshoe and M and X Flash Sync
Weight: 850 grams

Source: mikeeckman.com


Model

Engraved X 46064

Reference sites

mikeeckman.com


Manual

English manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

quarta-feira, 28 de agosto de 2019

Pentax MG (1981-1984)

Pentax MG (1981-1984)
#432
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Pentax MG was a product of Asahi Optical Co later called Pentax Corporation, introduced in 1981 and produced until 1984. It was a replacement of the MV and MV1 cameras as entry level 35mm semi-automatic camera.

The Pentax MG was a manual focus, aperture priority camera, with no manual settings of speeds. The Pentax MG had an electronic focal plane shutter from 1s to 1/1000, synchronized at 1/100. The shutter curtains were metal and had a vertical movement. However, if the batteries fail the camera still operated at 1/100s or B, thus the selector around the release button had three positions: Auto, 100X (1/100, X sync) and B. The exposure meter is center-weighted TTL type with open aperture measuring for Pentax M compatible lenses. The Pentax MG can use any Pentax K-mount and can still be used with current Pentax lenses. There was a self-timer and a hot shoe with an additional contact for dedicated Pentax flash units. The Pentax MG used 2 SR-44 batteries or equivalent to power it.

The Pentax MG had a 0.87x viewfinder, covering 92% of the field. The finder screen was fixed, with a split image and a microprism ring in the center. The shutter speed chosen by the camera was displayed in the finder by LEDs, which also indicated over/under exposure or slow speeds and the possibility of shaking. However the aperture was not displayed. The camera also had an exposure compensation from +2 to -2 EV.

Pentax MG with SMC Pentax-M 50/2 lens
The body resembles that of the M-Family of cameras such as the ME, MX, MV, etc. and as such was compatible with the external Winder ME (1.5 frame/s) or the later Winder ME II (2 frame/s). The Pentax MG could use the Dial Data ME databack with an adaptor to slide in the hot shoe, or it could make direct use of the Digital Data M databack. The Pentax MG was available in chrome or black finish.

Source: Wikipedia


Specifications


General
Lens Mount: K
Mount Limitations: The lens must be set to a numerical aperture
Self-Timer: 4 ~ 10 sec
Mirror Lock-Up: —
Cable Release: mechanical
Infra-Red Release: —
Additional Features: —
Width x Height x Depth: 132 x 85 x 49.5 mm
Weight: 423 g

Exposure System
Exposure Modes: Av
Metering Modes with K and M Lenses: center-weighted
Metering Modes with A and newer Lenses: center-weighted
Meter Material: GPD
Exposure Compensation (Step): XXX
Exposure Lock: —
Meter Range: 2 ~ 19 EV
Manual ISO Range: 25 ~ 1600 ASA

Shutter
Construction: electronic (vertical)
Material: metal
Shutter Speeds: 1 ~ 1/1000, B
Mechanical Speeds: X, B

Viewfinder
Magnification [Coverage]: 0.87x [92%]
Aperture Indication: —
Shutter-Speed Indication: LED
Interchangeable Screens: —

Power Source
Batteries: 2 x 1.5 Volt silver-oxide (A76, SR44) or alkaline (LR44)
External: —

Continuous Shooting
Continuous Shooting: manual wind lever
Compatible with Winder(s): ME, ME II

Flash System
Command Protocol(s): analog
Features: S
Synchronization Speed(s): 1/100 ~ 1, B
Built-In Flash: —

Accessories
Fitting Case(s): soft case: ME super MG

Source: kmp.pentaxians.eu


Model

Serial number 7285975


Reference sites

kmp.pentaxians.eu

Wikipedia


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 LR44 batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos




domingo, 18 de agosto de 2019

Canon A-1 (1978-1985)

Canon A-1 (1978-1985)

#431
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Canon A-1 is an advanced level single-lens reflex (SLR) 35 mm film camera for use with interchangeable lenses. It was manufactured by Canon Camera K. K. (today Canon Incorporated) in Japan from April 1978 to 1985. It employs a horizontal cloth-curtain focal-plane shutter with a speed range of 30 to 1/1000 second plus bulb and flash synchronization speed of 1/60 second. It has dimensions of 92 millimetres (3.6 in) height, 141 millimetres (5.6 in) width, 48 millimetres (1.9 in) depth and 620 grams (22 oz) weight. Unlike most SLRs of the time, it was available in only one color; all black. The introductory US list price for the body plus Canon FD 50 mm f/1.4 SSC lens was $625, the camera was generally sold with a 30–40% discount (roughly $375 to $435).

The A-1 is a historically significant camera. It was the first SLR to offer an electronically controlled programmed autoexposure mode. Instead of the photographer picking a shutter speed to freeze or blur motion and choosing a lens aperture f-stop to control depth of field (focus), the A-1 has a microprocessor programmed to automatically select a compromise exposure based on light meter input. Virtually all cameras today have at least one program mode.

Beginning with the amateur level Canon AE-1 of 1976, there was a complete overhaul of the entire Canon SLR line. The 1970s and 1980s were an era of intense competition among the major SLR brands: Canon, Nikon, Minolta, Pentax and Olympus. Between 1975 and 1985, there was a dramatic shift away from heavy all-metal manual mechanical camera bodies to much more compact bodies with integrated circuit (IC) electronic automation. In addition, because of rapid advances in electronics, the brands continually leapfrogged each other with models having new or more automatic features, and less expensive components and assembly. The industry was trying to expand out from the saturated high-end professional market and appeal to the large mass of low-end amateur photographers keen to move up from compact automatic leaf shutter rangefinder cameras to the more "glamorous" SLR but were intimidated by the need to learn all the details of operating a traditional SLR.

The A-1 is the high technology standard bearer of the landmark Canon amateur level A-series SLRs. The other members of the A-series are the Canon AE-1 (released 1976), AT-1 (1977), AV-1 (1979), AE-1 Program (1981) and AL-1 (1982). They all use the same compact aluminum alloy chassis, but with differing feature levels and outer cosmetic acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) plastic panels. By sharing most major components, and an inexpensive horizontal cloth-curtain shutter, costs could be spread out over a larger production volumes. The A-1 represented Canon's bid to defeat Nikon through more features and the cheapest price.

The A-1 caused a sensation when it was released in early 1978. Most photographers were amazed at its advanced features, years ahead of the competition, but in the face of changing technology, not all comments were positive. Professional photographers worried about the long term reliability of its consumer-level mechanical and electronic components under heavy daily use, the relatively slow flash sync and top shutter speeds. Traditionalist photographers complained about an "excess" of automation ruining the art of photography, a criticism that was leveled at all of the newly automated cameras released in the 1980s. However, automation turned out to be the right way to entice many new amateur photographers on a budget, and paid off very well for Canon.

The Canon A-1 was a runaway best seller, as it offered new SLR buyers considerable features and value for the price. It was reliable for its day in amateur usage. But as competitors brought out their own programmed SLRs,[1] the A-1 began to show its age. This is especially true for its horizontal cloth-curtain shutter, viewfinder information display and autoflash control. The A-1 was due for replacement when the Canon T90 came out in 1985. Canon's abandonment of the FD lens mount for the EOS design also had a significant effect on demand for the A-1 on the used market. But it is still regarded as one of the most fascinating SLRs of its generation and many are still in regular use.

Source: en.wikipedia.org


Specifications

The A-1 accepts any lens with the Canon FD breech lock mount (introduced in 1971) or Canon New FD pseudo-bayonet mount (sometimes called the FDn mount, introduced 1979). It can also use most earlier FL lenses and some even older R (or Canomatic) series lenses, albeit with reduced functionality. This excludes all of Canon's EF bayonet mount autofocus lenses (introduced in 1987). During the late 1970s and 1980s, there were approximately 55 Canon FD lenses available for purchase. They ranged from a 7.5mm f/5.6 fisheye to an FD 800mm f/5.6 telephoto, and included lenses with maximum apertures to f/1.2 and a line of L-series lenses of exceptional quality. Accessories for the A-1 included the Canon motor drive MA (automatic film advance up to 5 frames per second), the Canon Databack A (sequential numbering or date stamping on the film), and the Canon Speedlight 155A (guide number 56/17 (feet/meters) at ASA/ISO 100) and Canon Speedlight 199A (guide number 98/30 (feet/meters) at ASA/ISO 100) electronic flashes.

The A-1 is a battery-powered (one 4LR44 or PX-28) microprocessor-controlled manual-focus SLR with manual exposure control or shutter priority, aperture priority or programmed autoexposure. A fifth mode is "stopped down AE", in which the aperture is closed and alterable by the photographer and the camera selects the shutter speed based on the actual light reading. This differs from aperture priority in which the aperture is not closed until a photograph is taken and the shutter speed is calculated based on the light measured through the fully open aperture. Stopped down AE existed so that old FL lenses could be used with at least some kind of AE, and was also useful for photomicroscopy, manual-aperture lenses, etc. The A-1 is the first SLR to have all four of the now standard PASM exposure modes. It has a viewfinder exposure information system using a six-digit, seven-segment per digit, red alphanumeric LED display on the bottom of the viewfinder to indicate the readings of the built-in centerweighted, silicon photocell light meter. The focusing screen also has Canon's standard split image rangefinder and microprism collar focusing help.

Source: en.wikipedia.org

  • Type:35mm focal-plane shutter SLR camera
  • Picture Size: 24 x 36 mm
  • Normal Lens: Canon FD 55mm f/1.2 SSC, FD 50mm f/1.4 SSC
  • Lens Mount: FD mount
  • Shutter: Four-axis, horizontal-travel focal-plane shutter with cloth curtains. X, B, 30, 15, 8, 4, 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000 sec. All speeds controlled electronically. Built-in self-timer (with 2- and 10-sec. delay and blinking LED). Multiple exposures enabled with a lever. Electronic shutter release.
  • Flash Sync: X-sync automatic-switching sync contacts with German socket and hot shoe.
  • Viewfinder: Fixed eye-level pentaprism. 0.83x magnification, 93.4% vertical coverage, 95.3% horizontal coverage. Split-image rangefinder encircled by microprism rangefinder at center of fresnel matte screen. Eyepiece shutter provided. Six interchangeable focusing screens optional (installed by service personnel). The standard screen was later replaced by the brighter and sharper Laser Matte screen.
  • Viewfinder Information: Digital readout with 7-segment red LED for shutter speed, aperture, dedicated Speedlite flash-ready, manual settings, and warning displays.
  • Metering & Exposure Control: SPC for TTL full-aperture centerweighted averaging metering or TTL stopped-down metering. Exposure compensation range of 2 EV. AE lock provided. Five AE modes: Shutter speed-priority AE, aperture-priority AE, program AE, preset aperture-priority AE, and Speedlite AE (with dedicated Speedlite). The mode is set with a selector dial. Metering range at ISO 100 and f/1.4: EV -2 – 18. Film speed range from ISO 6 to 12800 in 1/3 steps.
  • Power Source: One 4G-13 6 V mercury oxide battery or 4LR44 alkaline battery. Battery check with button and blinking LED.
  • Film Loading & Advance: Slotted take-up spool. Advances with camera-top lever’s 120 stroke (partial strokes enabled). Ready position at 30.
  • Frame Counter: Counts up. Resets automatically when camera back is opened. Counts down during rewind.
  • Film Rewind: Camera-top crank
  • Dimensions & Weight:  141 x 92 x 48 mm, 620 g

Source: global.canon


Model

Serial number 1412230


Reference sites

en.wikipedia.org

global.canon

mir.com.my


Manual

English manual

Canon A-1 Repair Guide


Batteries

V28 PX 6V battery
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



sexta-feira, 16 de agosto de 2019

Werlisa Club Color (1976) (black model)

Werlisa Club Color (1976) (black model)
#430
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Simple plastic viewfinder camera made by Certex in Spain.

Source: camera-wiki.org

This is a cheap camera, from the 70´s & 80´s when in Spain was having a lot of “little” changes. It is a camera with focus free, and 3 positions for its speed. You must charge the film, pass this one and … shoot !!!

A lot of Spanish homes have a little camera like this: all our life, vacancies, work, … has been impressed in a lot of photographs taken by cameras like this one.
It was one the latest and genuine “Spanish product”, in the years that this was a very important thing in our world.
Today, all this little firms was for the great and omnipotent global trademarks, or simply closed the factories.
This lovely camera can rewind the film with the same mechanism like other cameras. You push the button in the “bottom” of the camera and, then, you can use the little crank in the left. It is easy to make doubles with other cameras …I like to do it with another ones. You can´t do doubles exposures, in the same point, but it will give you “special” results !!!

As the Werlisa Club Color only has two iso sensitivities (100 and 400 ISO), what I do is to load a spool of 200 ISO, and I use the references of 100 ISO to overexpose lightly the film. I believe that this camera answers of forceful form to the rule: Do not think!, just shoot! It does not have rear window to be able to see the spool that it has inside, it can be very useful for the “surprise effect” of the photos. It is robust and it bears very well the “ill-treatment”.

Source: lomography.com

Werlisa é o nome de uma extensa série de câmeras, em constante evolução, produzido por Certex, que marcou uma era na fotografia amadora na Espanha.
As câmeras são funcionais, com óptica boa, inteiramente adequado para fotografia a cores e teve um grande sucesso no mercado espanhol para os fãs à procura de uma câmara que lhes permitam memória de imagem.
O Werlisa Cor Club é a primeira das câmaras da segunda geração deste tipo feita por Certex, inspirou a criação de câmaras simples e de baixo custo que pode ser utilizado por um público não familiarizado com a fotografia e cuja única pretensão de tirar as fotos de memória.
Estas câmaras são caracterizadas pelo abandono de vidro e metal e com a introdução de plástico para o corpo para a óptica.

Source: flickr.com


Specifications

It has 3 settings on the ring around the focus free lens: sunny, cloudy and flash.

The lens is a Certar 38mm f/7.5, and there is only one shutterspeed. Film transport is done by a thumbwheel on the back of the camera, it also cocks the shutter. The camera does not need any batteries.

Source: camera-wiki.org

Tipo de Câmera: Compacta
Fabricados em: Espanha
Ano de fabricação: 1976
Objetiva: 38mm f Certa 7,5 de acrílico.
Obturador: Três velocidades (1 / 30, 1 / 60, 1 / 120).
Diafragma: Fixo (7.5)
Tipo de filme: 135 (Universal)
Foco: 2.5m ao infinito fixo.
Fabricante: Certex

Source: flickr.com


Model

Black model


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

flickr.com

lomography.com


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

quarta-feira, 14 de agosto de 2019

Pentax MX (1976-1985)

Pentax MX (1976-1985)
#429
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Pentax MX was a 35 mm single-lens reflex camera produced by Asahi Optical Co, later Pentax of Japan between 1976 and 1985. It was Pentax's flagship professional SLR until the introduction of the Pentax LX. Internally, the MX is essentially a smaller, lighter version of the Pentax KX, and otherwise has little in common with the rest of the Pentax M-series. However, the MX was designed as the mechanical twin sister of the remarkably successful entry-level Pentax ME.

The MX was solidly built, and featured a fully mechanical construction, including a mechanical shutter of the horizontal cloth type. Only the light metering system was dependent on batteries. The MX is all manual: it does not feature autofocus or autoexposure modes such as aperture-priority, shutter-speed priority, or full program.

A number of accessories were produced, among those: Focusing Screens

SC1: ground glass, split image device, microprism ring (standard)
SA1: ground glass, microprism patch
SA3: ground glass, microprism patch, for wide aperture lenses
SB1: ground glass, split image device
SD1: ground glass, cross collimator
SD11: aerial image, cross collimator
SE: ground glass
SG: ground glass, grid
SI: ground glass, axis,
Data backs, Dial Data MX and a bulk film back. Motorized winder Winder MX (2 frame/s) or a Motor MX (5 frame/s)motor drive.

Like all post-42 mm screwmount Pentax cameras, the MX accepts all K-mount lenses (with the exception of the newer FA-J and DA lenses without aperture rings).

Due to its complete lack of automatic functions, but excellent array of manual controls, the MX is often selected as a camera for photography students to practice their technique. The depth-of-field preview and self-timer functions render the MX superior in this respect to the earlier and cheaper Pentax K1000.

Source: wikipedia


Specifications

Year introduced: 1976
Mount: K
Meter range: 1 - 19 EV
Meter pattern: c
ISO range: 25 - 1600
DX ISO range: No DX coding
Exposure modes: M, B
Exposure compensation: Not applicable
Exposure lock: Not applicable
Shutter speeds (auto): Not applicable
Shutter speeds (manual): 1 - 1/1000s, B
Shutter speeds (mechanical): 1 - 1/1000s, B
Self timer: Yes
Mirror lock-up: No
Auto bracketing: Not applicable
Multiple exposures: Yes
Winder: External winder 2 fps, motor drive 1-5 fps
Built-in flash: No
TTL flash: No
P-TTL flash: No
Sync speed: 1/60s
Flash exposure comp: Not applicable
Autofocus: No
Autofocus sensitivity: Not applicable
Power zoom: No
Viewfinder: 0.97x, 95%
Viewfinder type: Pentaprism
Diopter correction: No
Exchangeable screen: Yes
Depth of field preview: Yes
Image size: 24 x 36 mm
Panorama format: No
Battery: 2 x S76
Battery grip/pack: Yes, for the motor drive
Size (W x H x D): 136 x 82.5 x 49.5 mm
Weight: 495 g

Source: pentaxforums.com

Model

Serial number 4037308


Reference sites

pentaxforums.com

wikipedia


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2 LR44 batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



terça-feira, 13 de agosto de 2019

Werlisa Club Color (1976) (burgundy model)

Werlisa Club Color (1976) (burgundy model)
#428
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

Simple plastic viewfinder camera made by Certex in Spain.

Source: camera-wiki.org

This is a cheap camera, from the 70´s & 80´s when in Spain was having a lot of “little” changes. It is a camera with focus free, and 3 positions for its speed. You must charge the film, pass this one and … shoot !!!

A lot of Spanish homes have a little camera like this: all our life, vacancies, work, … has been impressed in a lot of photographs taken by cameras like this one.
It was one the latest and genuine “Spanish product”, in the years that this was a very important thing in our world.
Today, all this little firms was for the great and omnipotent global trademarks, or simply closed the factories.
This lovely camera can rewind the film with the same mechanism like other cameras. You push the button in the “bottom” of the camera and, then, you can use the little crank in the left. It is easy to make doubles with other cameras …I like to do it with another ones. You can´t do doubles exposures, in the same point, but it will give you “special” results !!!

As the Werlisa Club Color only has two iso sensitivities (100 and 400 ISO), what I do is to load a spool of 200 ISO, and I use the references of 100 ISO to overexpose lightly the film. I believe that this camera answers of forceful form to the rule: Do not think!, just shoot! It does not have rear window to be able to see the spool that it has inside, it can be very useful for the “surprise effect” of the photos. It is robust and it bears very well the “ill-treatment”.

Source: lomography.com

Werlisa é o nome de uma extensa série de câmeras, em constante evolução, produzido por Certex, que marcou uma era na fotografia amadora na Espanha.
As câmeras são funcionais, com óptica boa, inteiramente adequado para fotografia a cores e teve um grande sucesso no mercado espanhol para os fãs à procura de uma câmara que lhes permitam memória de imagem.
O Werlisa Cor Club é a primeira das câmaras da segunda geração deste tipo feita por Certex, inspirou a criação de câmaras simples e de baixo custo que pode ser utilizado por um público não familiarizado com a fotografia e cuja única pretensão de tirar as fotos de memória.
Estas câmaras são caracterizadas pelo abandono de vidro e metal e com a introdução de plástico para o corpo para a óptica.

Source: flickr.com


Specifications

It has 3 settings on the ring around the focus free lens: sunny, cloudy and flash.

The lens is a Certar 38mm f/7.5, and there is only one shutterspeed. Film transport is done by a thumbwheel on the back of the camera, it also cocks the shutter. The camera does not need any batteries.

Source: camera-wiki.org

Tipo de Câmera: Compacta
Fabricados em: Espanha
Ano de fabricação: 1976
Objetiva: 38mm f Certa 7,5 de acrílico.
Obturador: Três velocidades (1 / 30, 1 / 60, 1 / 120).
Diafragma: Fixo (7.5)
Tipo de filme: 135 (Universal)
Foco: 2.5m ao infinito fixo.
Fabricante: Certex

Source: flickr.com


Model

Burgundy model


Reference sites

camera-wiki.org

flickr.com

lomography.com


Manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos

sábado, 3 de agosto de 2019

Yashica ME1 (~1977)

Yashica ME1 (~1977)
#427
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

he Yashica ME 1 is a small, compact 35mm viewfinder camera with auto-exposure, made in both Japan and Brazil by Yashica.
It was possibly the first camera produced in Brazil by the Yashica factory in Sorocaba Sao Paulo from 1977. Production in Japan appears to have been earlier,

The focus zone settings are visible in the viewfinder through a small square window, below the finder window. Behind the focus ring is an aperture ring - with an "A" setting for automatic and stops from f/2.8-16 for flash. Film advance is by a thumb-wheel on the lower left of the back.

The film speed is set using a ring around the lens, with a display just below. The CdS photocell is just above the lens, inside the filter thread - allowing the auto-exposure to compensate for filters.

The top plate carries the shutter release, hot shoe and frame counter. There is a lever for the self-timer on the front.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

Lens: Yashica 38mm f/2.8; 4 element, 3 group. 46mm filter thread.
Focus: 4 Zones (1, 1.5, 3m and infinity) and feet/metres scales
Metering: CdS cell
Shutter: Copal auto, speed set by metering, 1/60-1/360 sec.
Filter Thread: 46mm
Flash: hot shoe
Power: PX76A/675A 1.35v mercury button cell. Now Defunct but modern solutions exist
ASA 25 -500 with DIN Equivalents in multiple steps
Production country on base

Source: camerapedia


Model

Brazilian model. S/n 253532


Reference sites

camerapedia


Manual

English manual


Batteries
1 PX76A battery

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


domingo, 28 de julho de 2019

Kodak Retinette type 022 (1954-1958)

Kodak Retinette type 022 (1954-1958)
#426
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Kodak Retinette is a series of 35mm viewfinder cameras made in Germany by Kodak AG. They were a budget version of the Retina series, without rangefinders. The "B" models had light meters. The models are difficult to tell apart from a distance, but identifying features include EV numbers above the lens, flash sync slot on lens or body, and distance markings in feet (for UK) or meters (continental Europe). Some models also have a button next to the shutter release that enables double-exposures to be made. Pressing it allows the shutter to be cocked when winding on, without the film moving to the next frame.

Source: camerapedia

All Retinettes have a body serial number.

On Typs 147, 160, 012 and early 017 cameras (including French versions of Typ 017) the serial number is located inside the back door adjacent to the film pressure plate.
The remaining Retinette cameras have the body serial number engraved on the top housing.

Source: camerapedia


Specifications

Kodak Retinette (type 022)

Manufactured from 1954 to 1958. This model was the first of the rigid front Retinettes. Fitted with a Schneider Reomar 45mm f/3.5 lens in a Compur-Rapid shutter. There are a few variations of this model about, I have three different ones. Early ones have the flash socket on the shutter body rather than the front plate. A model was also made for the French market with an Angenieux lens in a Kodak shutter.

Body edges
The body edges at top and bottom of camera main casting are finished in black paint/lacquer in early examples and covered with thin chromed brass pressings in later examples.

Front panel
Earliest examples have a simple rectangular grey finished casting with f/stops engraved at top with no flash synch terminal on panel, the second type has a similar casting with a notch on right side for V,X lever, flash terminal on right and black arrow index mark for f/stops, third type is a rectangular chrome plated pressing with a " V" shape to front section and with with similar features to second type.

Shutter housing
The shutter housing itself changes from predominantly black to chrome.

Rewind knob style
Earliest type, flat dial, printing on top( reading anti-clockwise) Infrared/Kodachrome Daylight/Kodachrome-A/Plus X I Super XX

Intermediate type, flat dial, printing on top (reading anti-clockwise) Kadachr.D/Kodachr.F/Ektachr.D/Ektachr.F/Pan X/Plus X/Tri X

Late type, sloping dial, printing on top (reading anti-clockwise)as above.

Flash synch
First type on shutter body, later type on front panel

Rear door
Early type, cast one piece back door, late type two-piece pressing with riveted construction

Frame counter
Early type, chrome top piece slightly smaller diameter and completely round, late type larger diameter with a section of the rim notched on inboard side to allow easy setting.

Source: retinarescue

Kodak Retinette type 22 Description

The Kodak Retinette type 22 is a ‘little sister’ to the Kodak Retina cameras which Kodak made from the mid 1930s up until the late 1960s.

Initially the Retinette series followed the same folding, bellows design that the majority of the Retina cameras had, but this model, the type 22, was the first Retinette to move to a solid body single piece design – a move which later the Retina cameras followed.

The Retinette series were aimed at people who wanted a good camera which was reliable and would take good pictures, but wanted to pay a bit less than the top flight cameras of the day. I guess you could call them a ‘good snapshot’ camera. This model has a good range of shutter speeds for a camera of its vintage and, in common with many of its cousins in the Kodak stable, a very good lens.

Exposure system
Kodak Retinette Type 22 35mm camera - Side view showing flash sync
Side view showing flash sync and EV markings

The exposure system on the Retinette type 22 is based on the EV system, which was a popular option in the mid 1950s. It works on the premise that once you know the amount of light required for the film you are using, you can achieve it with several combinations of aperture and shutter speed. For example if the correct exposure is 1/250 sec at f/8 you can also get the same exposure by setting the speed one stop down and the aperture one stop up i.e. 1/500 sec at f/5.6.

This theory was used to calculate an EV or Exposure Value number and the EV number was engraved on the camera shutter. A light meter was used to measure the light which was a simple number and the camera set to this number. Then the aperture and shutter were locked together and could be rotated by the photographer to get the artistic effect they were after; faster speed to freeze action, wider aperture to blur the background or smaller aperture to keep everything in focus.

It’s a good system and continues to this day with Program Shift which is the modern invocation of the theory.

Film Advance
In common with many cameras in the Kodak range, the film advance is fitted to the bottom of the camera rather than the top. This is quite convenient in use but in my experience of fixing a couple of the Kodak series, it makes the camera more complex and more difficult to repair when it goes wrong.

The frame counter is on the top of the camera above the film advance lever. It’s a count down unit and doesn’t automatically reset so the photographer needed to set the counter to the number of exposures of the film loaded into the camera. When the film advance is used, the counter then shows the number of exposures remaining.

Other features.
There is a film type reminder fitted to the top of the film rewind shaft, a flash sync socket mounted on the front panel and, in common with many of the Retina and Retinette series, an unlock button on the top panel for occassions when you want to change the film mid-roll. This button disengages the film lock allowing the film advance to wind the camera on without cocking the shutter therefore allowing you to advance a film to a point mid-roll.

Kodak Retinette type 22 Specifications
35mm viewfinder camera
Compur rapid shutter
Shutter speeds 1 sec to 1/500 sec + bulb
Schneider – Kreuznach Reomar 45mm f/3.5 lens
Aperture f/3.5 to f/16
Film release button to allow mid-roll film changing
Approx 10 sec Self timer
Flash sync socket
Cold accessory shoe
Film Type reminder on rewind crank
Bottom mounted film advance
Auto frame counter
EV exposure control
Tripod mount
Back door release on base of camera
Manual focus with distance engraved in feet

Source: simonhawketts.co.uk


Download The Retinnete Guide


Model

Serial number 865343


Reference sites

camerapedia

kodak.3106.net

retinarescue

simonhawketts.co.uk


Manual

English manual


Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


sexta-feira, 19 de julho de 2019

Lomo LC-A (1984-2005)

Lomo LC-A (1984-2005)
#425
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

he LOMO Kompact Automat (LC-A) was produced by LOMO PLC in St. Petersburg, Russia from 1984 until 2005. This compact 35mm film viewfinder camera was based on the Cosina CX-2, but lacks the self-timer and is built with cheaper components, including the fairly soft Minitar lens.

It was the LOMO LC-A that sparked the Lomographic Society (LSI).

After production ended, LSI contracted with Phenix Optical Company in China to create an updated version called the LC-A+.

Source: camerapedia

Lomo Compact group consists of 5 different cameras. Although the famous Lomo LC-A is surely the most promoted soviet camera in the World, at least 3 of the rest cameras are almost unknown to collectors community indeed. Below you will find an unique information about all 5 Lomo Compact cameras with actual pictures of real cameras, not the bad quality paper scans.

Beeing actually an exact COSINA CX copy, LOMO LC-A is just a crappy little Soviet/Russian compact 35mm camera with scale focusing and automatic exposure control.  It also sports a 32mm lens which is slightly wider  than most compact 35's.

Source: sovietcams.com

The Lomo LC-A should be nothing more than historical curio, something that crops up in the collections of the most die-hard Soviet camera collectors. Like more than a few Soviet camera designs, the LC-A was a Soviet redesign of a Western camera – in this case Cosina’s CX-1 and CX-2, pocket-sized Japanese compact 35mm cameras with a superb lens.

The designers at Lomo (Leningradskoye Optiko-Mekhanicheskoye Obyedinenie) in Leningrad (now St Petersburg) first clapped eyes on the Cosina – history is split over whether it was a CX-1 or a CX-2 – in the early 1980s. The Lomo top brass were impressed with the little Japanese camera, which boasted a sharp, contrasty lens that resulted in rich, saturated colours, heightened by vignetting around the corners. By 1984, Lomo’s engineers had managed to build a ‘tribute’, a faithful yet simplified version. They called it the Lomo Kompakt Automat – or, as it would be known in the West in the decades to come, the LC-A.

Lomo began producing 1,100 a month of these cameras from June 1984. Unlike the ubiquitous Zenit SLRs, a favourite of many budget-minded amateur photographers in Western Europe, the LC-A was intended for domestic consumption. In fact, some 5,000 LC-As were especially stamped to commemorate the 27th Communist Party Congress in Moscow in 1986 (the first presided over by reform-minded party chairman Mikhail Gorbachev).

With the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, this strange little camera – which had built up many a fan in Soviet-aligned countries – became a secret no longer. And when a bunch of Austrian art students – the group who would later form Lomography in Vienna – found an LC-A in a Prague junk shop that year, they catapulted the LC-A to global fame.

As the LC-A celebrates its 33rd birthday, Kosmo Foto is profiling the family of cameras inspired by Lomo’s humble LC-A.

Source: kosmofoto.com


Specifications

First produced in 1984, the LC-A was almost unknown outside the USSR and other Communist states until the end of the Cold War. A cruder copy of Cosina’s CX-1 and CX-2, the LC-A shared many of the cult Cosina’s features (its biggest change was getting rid of the moving lens cover of the Cosina in favour of a simpler slider). It was a zone focus viewfinder camera, with four focus zones to choose from (0.8m, 1.5m, 3m and infinity) and an automatic setting (via a lever on the front left of the camera) that chose both shutter speed and aperture.

The LC-A’s 32/2.8 Minitar lens had an aperture range of f2.8 to 16, and its shutter speeds went from 1/500 to two seconds; more than enough to capture a shot in all but the most difficult lighting. Should photographers want a little more control, they could choose an aperture manually – but they would be restricted to a single shutter speed of 1/60. In reality, most snappers simply stuck the LC-A on ‘A’ and fired away.

The LC-A’s ability to keep the shutter open long enough in low light was one of its secret weapons. LC-A fans soon learn that shooting it handheld (the LC-A came with a tripod socket but no hole for a cable release in the shutter button) meant light sources would often become abstract trails. These were heightened by the lens’s tendency to boost contrast and vignetting, which could be further boosted by shooting cross-processed slides – Agfa’s original CT100 Precisa and Kodak’s Elite Chrome 100 soon became the standard for LC-A fans.

The LC-A further aligned itself as a night-time camera thanks to its qualities when used with a flash – the LC-A uses rear-curtain flash, rendering the background of a scene before the flash illuminates the front.

Original LC-As – sporting the name in Cyrillic letters and a tiny CCCP badge on the back – used the Soviet film rating system, GOST, which is close to but not exactly aligned to the West’s ASA/ISO rating (GOST 65 is roughly equivalent to 100 ISO). The highest GOST setting is 250, the equivalent to around 400 ISO.

There, were, however, various export models of the LC-A that used the Western alphabet and Western ISO settings aswell. Some of these were exported as the “Zenith Lomo”, perhaps to trade in on the Zenit brand name that was so well known in the UK.

Soviet-era LC-As still crop up reasonably often on eBay – and should you head east of Berlin on your travels, they’re still fairly common in cameras stores and flea markets. The major cause of failure is damage to the electronics – if these are on the blink, an LC-A is little more than a paperweight, as without batteries or a functioning exposure system, the camera’s shutter won’t open properly. Thankfully, the LC-A runs on three buttoncell LR44/SR44 batteries, which are cheap and plentiful.

Source: kosmofoto.com


Model

PK7350. The most common Lomo LC-A type to find nowadays. Export "LOMO" markings on the frontplate. International ASA settings. No otherwise different.

Source: sovietcams.com


Reference sites

camerapedia

kosmofoto.com

sovietcams.com


Manual

English manual


Batteries

3 LR44 batteries

Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos


domingo, 7 de julho de 2019

Pentax SF7 (1988)

Pentax SF7 (1988)
#424
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

The Pentax SF7 was a camera from the Japanese Pentax brand, manufactured by the Asahi Optical Co., Ltd. (called PENTAX Corporation since 2002). It is also known as the Pentax SF10 in the United States, and was first produced in 1988. It was Pentax's third Autofocus 35mm SLR after the Pentax ME F and the very similar Pentax SFX.

Source: wikipedia.org

This Pentax SLR comes from the SF range of cameras which Pentax introduced before the Z and MZ range, and were the first set of autofocus SLR cameras the company made. This model, the Pentax SF10 was also known as the SF7 and is similar in styling to the SFXn camera which I own, but is a rather simpler and more basic model than that. It was manufactured in about 1988.

This is a sturdy and heavy camera, similar in weight and very slightly bigger than my digital  Pentax K5 DSLR. Although heavy cameras are not a lot of fun to carry about, it is a good camera to get a hold of. The hand grip is quite deep and has a contoured feel which fits in the hand quite nicely. The shutter button falls nicely in place when the camera is in the hand, and it’s easy enough to alter shutter settings with the rocker switch placed behind the shutter button.

Changing modes however is a different matter. This camera was made at a time when electronics were being introduced into camera manufacture, and lots of cameras at this time had button press rather than rotary knobs to change settings and I find they are not as easy or quick. On this camera the one saving grace is the way the camera modes are displayed; Instead of a small A, P, S etc displayed in a small LCD screen, the SF series had large LCD panels mounted on the top of the SLR prism. On the Pentax SF10, this LCD has a display which incorporated an outline shape of the camera which changes to show graphically the modes, and configuration changes.

The control buttons on the top panel of the camera are the mode button discussed above, a button to control the different drive modes, a rocker switch positioned behind the shutter release and the On/Off switch which has an optional ‘beep’ setting for audible feedback. On the back of the camera just behind the hot shoe is an exposure lock button and on the side of the lens mount is the Auto focus/Manual focus switch with an electronic cable release socket above.

The lens mount fitted to the SF10 is a full KAF mount, which means this camera can use any pentax lens made up to the point the camera was made. It obviously wouldn’t be able to focus a modern ultrasonic motor lens, but any screw thread focused lens or manual K mount lens should be fine.

This camera offers all the normal exposure modes most photographers need and regularly use, but doesn’t feature the ‘scene’ modes which are popular these days. This, of course is because it was made earlier than that sort of feature was introduced.

The exposure modes are selected with a combination of the mode button, the rocker switch and the aperture ring on the lens. If the lens aperture ring is set to ‘A’ the mode button and rocker switch will toggle between ‘PROG’ (program or fully automatic mode) and Shutter priority. These modes are shown on the top panel LCD as a series of updates to the picture of the camera – some examples can be seen in the pictures above.

Once the aperture ring is moved off the ‘A’ setting, the mode button and the rocker switch will toggle between AUTO (aperture priority), fully manual mode and bulb.

There is no option to provide any exposure compensation on this camera and since it’s also not possible to override the DX coding of the film speed that includes the trick of changing the film speed. There is an exposure memory lock button however which can be used to meter a particular portion of a scene and then lock the exposure to that reading.

The metering in the camera is a 2 segment averaged reading with autofocus lenses which changes to centre weighted with manual focus lenses.

As I said in the opening paragraph, this is one of the first autofocus cameras which Pentax made and employs a motor in the body of the camera which drives the focus ring via a screw thread coupling. This system has been maintained by Pentax up to the present day and my Pentax K5 can focus the lens fitted to the SF10 in exactly the same way (considerably faster of course and in lower light).

The autofocus performance of the Pentax SF10 is reasonable for the age of the camera. It wouldn’t win any speed battles today, but considering this is a 1st generation autofocus camera it’s reasonably fast in good light as long as the target area has some contrasting patterns. When the light level drops it does a bit of hunting about to find the correct position, but most of the time it will eventually get there. It’s not a quick or accurate as my SFXn, but then it was at the cheaper end of the SF series and the SFXn was at the top end. It is quite noisy during focusing – not just noise from the lens moving but from the focus motor itself which has a high pitched whine. It reminds me of the Minolta 7000 which was also a 1st generation autofocus camera.

In common with all the early autofocus cameras I own there is only one focus sensor fitted in the centre of the viewfinder. That may be considered a disadvantage but in my experience I find one to be fine. I normally use the single central focus point anyway and use the ‘focus and re-compose’ option if I need to focus on something non central. Obviously modern cameras have many focus points in order to do focus tracking, but a camera of this age simply doesn’t have the speed to do that anyway.

For situations where there really isn’t enough light to successfully achieve focus lock there is a small lamp built into the flash housing which is used to strobe the scene and get the lens to lock. I found on my copy of the camera this was not very successful, but again the light wasn’t very bright so it may be just age which has caused it to dim. The camera won’t pop the flash up to use this light by itself, it needs to be raised by the photographer. Looking at the button which raises the flash I would guess it’s a mechanical rather than electrical switch so the camera couldn’t raise it anyway.

When focus is achieved there is a large indicator in the viewfinder which lights and an optional beep can sound as well, both of these also work when the camera is in manual focus mode either by switching the AF/MF switch or by fitting a manual focus lens. Although I like split image focusing screens for manual focus, the focus indicator is actually quite a useful device with manual lenses.

There is one other point I’d like to make about the autofocus on this camera. I have two Sigma autofocus lenses which this camera won’t focus. They are both screw driven autofocus lenses which work without problem on my K5 and any of my MZ series cameras but the screw drive doesn’t turn when they are fitted to the SF10. I checked that the screw drive is engaging with the camera body and it is because turning the focus ring in autofocus mode results in the focus motor in the body turning (I wouldn’t recommend doing this by the way). I wondered if it was something a bit odd with this particular camera so I tried them both on my SFXn and found exactly the same thing. Just for information the two lenses are a Sigma Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 and a Sigma Zoom 24-70mm f/3.5-5.6 UC.

The Pentax SF10 is equipped with a pentaprism viewfinder rather than the pentamirror finder used in the lower end MZ series cameras. This is welcome because it leads to a much brighter view, especially when used with a fast lens. Other than being a prism finder, the viewfinder is somewhat disappointing because there is no Depth of field preview available and also no diopter adjustment.

In terms of exposure and focus information visible in the viewfinder the shutter speeds are visible on the right hand side of the viewfinder and the letter ‘A’, ‘M’ or ‘P’ above to indicate the exposure mode. As mentioned above there is a focus indicator to show when focus is achieved and right at the bottom of the shutter speeds the letters LT indicate when a shutter speed longer than 1/30sec has been selected. All the shutter speeds below 1/60sec are in yellow indicating a tripod should be used – the rest are in green although the 1/2000sec speed will flash if the exposure is over exposed when 1/2000 is selected.

The drive modes are set using the drive mode button and the rocker switch. The camera has a fairly simple selection of single shot, continuous shot and self timer mode. The self timer is electronic with an LED on the front of the hand grip illuminated when the timer is running and the beep option counting the timer down. When the last couple of seconds are reached the LED flashes in unison with the beep for a couple of seconds and then the shutter fires.

This was an entry level camera when the SF series was introduced by Pentax and as such it is missing some of the top end functions the SFXn camera had. However most of the functions most photographers would use are here with the exception of exposure compensation. Even that could be worked around by using the Exposure Lock button so it’s more an inconvenience rather than a deal breaker.

Many people may say the camera is too big and heavy and you certainly know you are carrying it around but it is pretty well balanced and comfortable to use.

Source: simonhawketts.co.uk

Specifications

Year introduced: 1988
Mount: KAF
Meter range: 1 - 19 EV
Meter pattern: c
ISO range: DX only
DX ISO range: 25 - 5000
Exposure modes: P, Av, Tv, M, B
Exposure compensation: No
Exposure memory lock: Yes
Shutter speeds (auto): 30 - 1/2000s
Shutter speeds (manual): 1 - 1/2000s
Shutter speeds (mechanical): None
Self timer: Yes
Mirror lock-up: No
Auto bracketing: No
Multiple exposures: No
Winder: Built 2 fps
Built-in flash: Yes, GN 12
TTL flash: Yes
P-TTL flash: No
Sync speed: 1/100s
Flash exposure comp: No
Autofocus: Yes (1 point)
Autofocus sensitivity: 2 - 18 EV
Power zoom: No
Viewfinder: 0.81x, 92%
Viewfinder type: Pentaprism
Diopter correction: No
Exchangeable screen: No
Depth of field preview: No
Image size: 24 x 36 mm
Panorama format: No
Battery: 2CR5
Battery grip/pack: No
Size (W x H x D): 157 x 99 x 63.5 mm
Weight: 630 g
Comment: Special accessory: Interval data back

Source: pentaxforums.com


Pentax SF10 35mm Autofocus SLR (also known as SF7)
1st Generation autofocus camera
Aperture priority, Shutter Priority, Program Mode & full Manual Mode
2 segment averaged metering with F series lenses, centre weighted with others
KAF mount accepts all K mount lenses
Solid, well built construction
Single autofocus sensor centrally mounted.
Pentaprism viewfinder
Integrated RTF flash with autofocus assist light
Shutter speed 30sec to 1/2000sec + Bulb
Self timer with electronic countdown and visual indication
Single shot and multiple shot mode
Optional beep function for focus lock
Focus confirmation light in the viewfinder
Integrated off centre hot shoe
Exposure lock
DX coded film chamber
Electronic cable release socket
Powered by 2CR5 battery in grip

Source: simonhawketts.co.uk


Model

Serial number 5236556


Reference sites

pentaxforums.com

simonhawketts.co.uk

wikipedia.org


Manual

English manual


Batteries

2CR5 battery
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos



quarta-feira, 3 de julho de 2019

Olympus OM707 (1986)

Olympus OM707 (1986)
#423
This photo is from the copy I own

History and technical features 

he Olympus OM-707 was released by Olympus as part of its successful OM system in 1986, and was their first attempt to make a fully autofocus SLR body. On some markets, it was called OM-77.

In 1985 the Minolta 7000 had been a usable AF SLR, after various unsuccessful attempts like the Pentax ME-F, the Olympus OM-30, the Canon T-80 and the more serious Nikon F3AF. It led to rival models including the Nikon F-501, the Canon EOS 650, the Olympus OM-707 and the Pentax SFX being released. The OM-707 was the least successful of all. It maintained the OM bayonet mount and could mount all the Olympus OM lenses, but the new OM AF lenses specially designed for the autofocus did not have any manual focusing ring. This was unpopular because the first autofocus systems weren't very accurate or sensitive and there were many cases when manual override was necessary. Olympus' solution to this was to include a 'Power Focus' feature whereby a sliding 'shift knob' on the rear of the camera controls the focus. This is relatively accurate, though does not offer the same precision or speed as a manually-focused lens offers. This feature actually outlived Olympus' OM autofocus to reappear on the OM-101 which was Power Focus only. The OM-707 generally lacked all the features of a top range camera, and was aimed at the middle range market, like the OM-10.

The OM-707 also dropped compatibility with nearly all the accessories that made so much for the success of the OM system. There was one OM system accessory released specifically for this camera however: its partner the F280 Full-Synchro stroboscopic flash, syncing with this up to 1/2000 of a second. This flash/camera combination was reportedly the first in the world to offer such high speed syncing. The F280 also features a high-power AF illuminator lamp to aid low light focussing.

Another 'accessory' released for the OM-707 was the option of two grips with which to hold the camera. The Power Flash Grip 300 is powered by 4x AAA batteries and features a built-in pop-up flash; the alternative Power Grip 100 is again powered by 4x AAA, features no flash, but is far less bulky to operate. Both grips feature the shutter release switch: without a grip attached the camera is unusable and un-powered.

Unfortunately, the robustness of both Power Grip 100 and Power Flash Grip 300 is poor, with many suffering from failures of the plastic casing around the battery covers, rendering many otherwise perfect cameras unusable. Olympus were inundated with warranty claims and repaired many of these grips under warranty, some more than once within 12 months! There was no revised design, so even repaired grips have the same reliability issues. Spare grip casings were available (from Luton Cameras - Olympus UK repair agent) until around 2002, but are no longer available.

Occasionally the battery covers themselves for both Power Grip 100 and Power Flash Grip 300 become available on ebay at around $16 from a camera repair agent in USA, but these are only suitable as replacements for lost battery covers, and will not solve the more common failure issue with both grips which is the casing itself.

Any would - be purchaser on ebay or other auction sites would be well advised to ask about the condition of the battery cover, as many are crudely repaired with tape or screwed shut. Those with secure battery covers are at a premium.

The market failure of the OM-707 led Olympus to go in a different direction. They made one last camera using the autofocus/powerfocus lenses, the OM-101 and then began to develop the IS series bridge cameras. Today Olympus continues this strategy of producing cameras somewhat different from the other makers with the Four-Thirds and 'E' systems.

Source: camerapedia

The Olympus OM707 is a camera Olympus would probably rather forget all about. But the fact that almost everyone else had indeed forgotten about it is probably of little comfort! The OM707 was Olympus's first and last 35mm AF SLR, and I don't think it's going too far to say that the OM707 was a disaster for Olympus: it's failure effectively brought about the end of what had been one of the iconic 35mm SLR systems of the 1970s and 1980s. The OM707 was launched in 1986, and by 1987 Olympus has practically given up on 35mm SLRs, having deleted almost their entire line. The only models that survived any significant time were the expensive, top-of-the-line OM-3Ti and OM-4Ti models.

Olympus went on to launch just 3 35mm SLR cameras post OM707, only one of which was genuinely new and genuinely Olympus: that was 1988s even more forgettable power-focus-but-not-auto-focus OM101. 7 years later in 1995 Olympus surprised everyone by launching an updated version of the all-manual, all-mechanical, OM-3 called the OM-3Ti. But by then it was nothing more than a beautiful and charming anachronism that sold for Leica-like prices only to well-healed collectors. (The OM-3Ti is still a very valuable collector’s item today.)  The last OM camera was OM2000 from 1997, but it wasn't a real Olympus at all. It was made by Cosina and apart from the OM lens mount it wasn't compatible with any of the Olympus OM system. The OM system limped on in this state until the early 2000s.

I've always had it in my mind that the reason Olympus failed so spectacularly with the OM707 was because they were late to the AF SLR party. But when I did some research on the OM707 I found that this wasn't the case at all. In fact Olympus were among the first to act after the launch of the first true body-integral AF SLR, the Minolta Dynax 7000. Here's the chronology: Minolta launched the Dynax 7000 in 1985, Nikon launched the F501 and Olympus the OM707 in 1986. And finally Canon launched the EOS 650 and Pentax the SFX in 1987. In other words Olympus beat Canon to the market by some margin, and yet it was Canon that went on to thoroughly dominate both the professional and consumer 35mm AF SLR markets with their EOS system. Not only that, but Olympus as quick to launch a surprisingly comprehensive set of AF lenses for the OM707. Within a couple of months they had a set of 8 lenses with focal lengths from 24mm to 210mm, including a macro lens.

So if being late to the party wasn't the problem, why was the OM707 such a disastrous failure?

I think the first reason was that the OM707 was strictly an auto-only camera. The OM707 was, like all early AF SLRs, an expensive piece of cutting-edge technology. Yet in the minds of most camera buyers a lack of any kind of manual mode indicates a low-end beginner's camera. The OM707 did have what at the time was a highly innovate program-shift facility, so you did have some control over shutter speed and aperture. But although the OM707 provided some control over shutter sped and aperture, the only way to influence the exposure value selected by the camera was an exposure lock… there was no exposure compensation facility and now way to manually set ISO. So there just wasn't enough manual control to attract the kind of person who was willing to spend serious dollar on the latest cutting-edge tech.

But I don't think that was Olympus's biggest mistake with the OM707; the real disaster was the design of the lenses. The OM AF lens mount was Olympus's first attempt to modernise the OM lens mount since it was introduced in 1972. While other manufactures were busy adding electronic communications to their lens mounts even in the manual focus era, Olympus refused to change the OM mount at all. This was what prevented Olympus from ever offering a true multi-mode electronic control camera.

But with the OM AF lenses they took the brave but ultimately fool-hardy decision to remove all controls from the lenses (except for the zoom control in the case of zoom lenses). Yes… that's right… they didn't just remove the aperture ring from their interchangeable lenses like Canon and Minolta did, they removed the focus ring too. In fact, as far as I know, there were the only company to do this. There was a manual focus control, but this involved using a power-focus control on the camera body. Olympus made things even worse by using the same slider control on the camera body to control both the program-shift function and the power-focus function. So you could control aperture/shutter speed, or you could manually focus, but not both at the same time!

Like Nikon and Pentax, Olympus chose to add AF capabilities to their existing OM lens mount rather than then introduce an entirely new AF lens mount (which is what Canon and Minolta did). So you could mount an only OM lens on the OM707 without an adaptor effectively giving you an aperture-priority auto-only camera with manual focus… but this was only an effective option for existing OM system owners… if you’re new to a system you don’t want to have to buy a duplicate set of old legacy lenses just to get proper manual focus!

The decision to make the OM707 an auto-only camera could easily have been fixed with the next camera, but the lack of a focusing control on the lenses would have been much harder to fix. Lenses should be a much longer term investment than cameras. With an SLR you not just buying a camera, your buying into a camera system. People want to preserve their expensive investment in lenses by continuing using them when new cameras are launched. Understandably people were reluctant to buy lenses without focus controls and risk the possibility of rendering them useless if Olympus had decided to abandon the highly unpopular on-body power-focus control on later camera bodies.

Another problem was that all though you could put older OM lenses on your OM707, the lack of a focus control (plus the lack of the normal OM lens release button) meant you couldn't use your OM AF lens on an older OM body in manual focus mode. This was something you could do with both Nikon and Pentax AF lenses.

But failures can sometimes interesting because unlike 10-a-penny successful cameras the tend to be rare because no-one bought them.

And the OM707 did have a number of highly innovated features, many of which were firsts: a program mode with program-shift functionality (Canon launched the T90 with program shift functionality also in 1986, but I'm not sure which was first… let's call it a dead-heat!), lenses without focus controls and an on-body power-focus control (though as already discussed this was innovative but foolish!), plus the first flash system with allowed flash sync at all shutter speeds with a focal-plane shutter (with the F280 flash unit). The design had some interesting little quirks too, like the grip with a built in pop-up flash (a smaller grip without a pop-up flash was available too).

But the list of disadvantages is much longer! There is no exposure compensation, no way to manually set the ISO setting, no depth of field preview (which was available on all previous OM cameras as the depth-of-field preview button was on the lens with older OM lenses), the power manual focusing is horrible and you can't use your new lenses on your old OM camera, And the final nail in the OM707 coffin is the awful handling, as least it is with the power grip 300 with the built in flash that came with my camera. Somehow the shutter button is much to low down the front of the camera and the power-focus/program shift slider control is in the wrong place, at least for left-eyed people like me… you always seem to end up jabbing your right thumb into you right eye when you use it!

In fact now I have an OM707 in my hot little hands I think I've been cured of my fascination… let's just say I'm glad I only paid £11.50 for it!

Source: cjo.info


Specifications

Shutter: Electronically controlled vertical travel focal-plane shutter. Shutter speed: 2–1/2000 sec
Lens Mount: Olympus OM for AF lenses (accepts OM manual and OM-AF lenses)
Exposure Control: TTL 'OTF' centre-weighted.
Exposure Mode: Program; Program shift (with shift knob); Aperture priority with OM manual lenses.
AE lock; AF lock
Flash Control: Full synchro with F280; TTL 'flashmatic' sync up to 1/100 with PowerGrip 300; TTL direct 'OTF' with T-series flashes.
Viewfinder: 93% of field fixed screen with marked autofocus zone
Auto film loading; auto film advance (1.5 fps); auto film rewind
12 second self-timer
Weight: 555g without lens/grip/batteries
Built-in AF Illuminator lamp

Source: camerapedia


Model

Serail number 2040682


Reference sites

camerapedia

cjo.info



Manual

English manual

Extra language pages


Batteries

4 AAA batteries
Film


Pictures taken with this machine



Videos